Harrat Lunayyir https://www.scienceblogs.com/ en The 2009 Pliny for Volcanic Event of the Year goes to ... https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/01/01/the-2009-pliny-for-volcanic-ev <span>The 2009 Pliny for Volcanic Event of the Year goes to ...</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>2009 is over! If you missed the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/2009_the_volcanic_year_in_revi.php" target="_blank">Volcanic Year in Review</a>, check out my summary of the volcanic events that captivated many of us over the past year. However, only one event will get the coveted 2009 Pliny for Volcanic Event of the Year. A lot of you<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/nominations_for_the_2009_volca.php" target="_blank"> wrote in with votes and comments</a> - I thank you - and a number of events stood out in your mind. Here we go:</p> <p><strong>Honorable mention</strong><br /> A few volcanic events got multiple votes:<br /> - <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/soufriere_hills/" target="_blank">Soufriere Hills</a> on Montserrat.<br /> - <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/manda_hararo/" target="_blank">Mando Hararo</a> in Ethiopia.<br /> - <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/chaiten/" target="_blank">Chaiten, Chile</a> and<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/the_speedy_magma_of_chaiten_an.php" target="_blank"> the new research</a> on the eruption.<br /> - The earthquakes in western Saudi Arabia under the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/harrat_lunayyir/" target="_blank">Harrat Lunayyir</a> volcanic field. </p><p><strong>The Top 5</strong><br /><em>4 (tied): West Mata and Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai</em><br /><img src="http://www.virginmedia.com/images/tonga-volcano2-430x300.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai erupting in March 2009.</em><br /> It seems oddly fitting that two submarine volcanic eruptions tied for 4th. <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/hunga_tonga_hunga_haapai_1/" target="_blank">Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai</a> eventually became subaerial, but <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/west_mata/" target="_blank">West Mata</a> showed us the first real explosive volcanism caught on camera in deep ocean conditions.</p> <p><em>3: Mayon, Philippines</em><br /><img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/12/30/article-0-050689A60000044D-864_634x425.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Mayon erupting with lava flows from the summit dome, December 2009.</em><br /> Possibly the last year activity helped boost its placing, but a large <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/mayon/" target="_blank">Mayon</a> eruption would be a significant event no matter what. While that hasn't happened just yet, over 50,000 people have been evacuated and lava flows are cascading down the sides of the picturesque Philippine volcano. Look for Mayon to make news well into 2010.</p> <p><em>2: Redoubt, Alaska</em><br /><img src="http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/avo/dbimages/display/1238301230_ak231.JPG" width="400" /><br /><em>Redoubt erupting on March 28, 2009. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS, taken by Tricia Joy Sadler.</em><br /> The eruption of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/redoubt/" target="_blank">Redoubt</a> got our attention in January and didn't let go for months - will it erupt? When will it erupt? How big will it be? When all was said and done (?), the eruption was relatively minor - the Anchorage airports were only briefly closed and the oil production in the area has resumed (albeit with the Drift River Oil Terminal closed for good). However, the lasting legacy of Redoubt might be how closely this event was monitored from start to finish by the Alaska Volcano Observatory - and how much information they put out for public consumption (via Twitter no less). Redoubt was the first 21st century, digital age volcanic eruption ... and <a href="http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/report_getter.php?need=current&amp;id=4975&amp;type=2" target="_blank">it might not be over</a>.</p> <p><em>The 2009 Pliny winner for Volcanic Event of the Year</em><br /><img src="http://www.learner.org/interactives/historical/media/stories/journal/journal_plinyTheYounger_ill02.jpg" width="100" /></p> <h2>Sarychev Peak, Russia</h2> <p><img src="http://www.theblogofrecord.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/sarychev-peak-volcano-eruption-photographed-from-the-international-space-station.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Sarychev Peak erupting in June 2009, taken from the ISS.</em><br /> It might have come out of the blue - it might not have even lasted as long as other eruptions in 2009, but it was the images of the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/sarychev_peak/" target="_blank">Sarychev Peak</a> eruption that captured out imagination. The sequence of <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVl-PELirDo" target="_blank">pictures taken of the plume from the International Space Station</a> might be the most stunning images of a volcanic eruption ever taken and the plethora of<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=38937" target="_blank"> satellite images of the eruption collected by the NASA Earth Observatory</a> let us see the mammoth eruption in all its splendor. The eruption wreaked havoc on transpacific flights over the Kuril Islands for weeks - but it is fascinating that an eruption that took place near almost no one has ended up being seen by almost everyone.</p> <p>Happy 2010 to all my <em>Eruptions</em> readers ... !</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 12/31/2009 - 21:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/alaska" hreflang="en">Alaska</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chaiten" hreflang="en">Chaiten</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chile" hreflang="en">Chile</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ethiopia" hreflang="en">Ethiopia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hunga-tonga-hunga-haapai" hreflang="en">Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha&#039;apai</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/manda-hararo" hreflang="en">Manda Hararo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mayon" hreflang="en">Mayon</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa-earth-observatory" hreflang="en">NASA Earth Observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/philippines" hreflang="en">Philippines</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pliny" hreflang="en">Pliny</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/redoubt" hreflang="en">Redoubt</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/russia" hreflang="en">russia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sarychev-peak" hreflang="en">Sarychev Peak</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-journalism" hreflang="en">Science Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soufriere-hills" hreflang="en">Soufriere Hills</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/tonga" hreflang="en">Tonga</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-event-year" hreflang="en">Volcanic Event of the Year</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/west-mata" hreflang="en">West Mata</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188669" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262317462"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Happy new 2010 to everybody and Congratulations to Sarychev, a volcano that I am sure fully deserved being "the volcano of the year". Not only because it featured spectacularly in one of the most spectacular volcano photos ever taken, but also because it was a BIG eruption - a far cry maybe from Chaitén or Pinatubo, but probably among the most voluminous eruptions of the year.<br /> Now let's see what volcanic events the new year will bring ... Mayon seems to be dropping out of sight for the moment (but I remember during its 1984 eruption it came back spectacularly after about one week of very low level activity, and also in 1993 and 2001 there were significant pauses in the activity).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188669&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="QFvoAVgofJksBj8ZNjrHThA236x58Dc8vOK77sCmO_M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188669">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188670" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262334648"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>i appreciate Your considering Redoubt as the Volcano of the Year. i live across Cook Inlet and my little grandson lives 70 miles south of me and had a clear view of one of the more spectacular eruptions and happened to be out in his yard talking to me on a cell phone. He was quite concerned and was telling me all about it......"Mots, Mots..... it's scary scary!" as the hugh black cloud exploded upward. i couldn't see a thing; being too close and having a cloudy sky. It's alright, It's Ok, It's going to be ok, i tried to console the little guy...... He turned to the rest of the crowd and announced releaved...."Mots says it's going to be ok." with total relief. ........</p> <p>Later i caught a film of that particular explosion........<br /> it WAS SCARRY SCARRY! i don't think my grandmother could have convinced me that it was going to be all right!</p> <p>What undeserved power we have.<br /> Happy New Year, Everyone!<br /> Try to deserve the trust of our grandchildren.<br /> Best!motsfo</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188670&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="69yX-z2F9Co6Uzcqq7EHlr7YsJyt-Rh7ipJK-vb_ieI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mots (not verified)</span> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188670">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188671" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262356310"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, obviously this one had my vote; timing is everything. If the ISS had been 15 minutes earlier or an hour later, this growing eruption column would have been either missed or spread out. They caught in ascent; lucky and spectacular.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188671&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mkPOFql5ljsOtMxsRj0IqfQJNy5po2c4Rqs5uyC0b5w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://tugpullpushstop.blogspot.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Oakden Wolf (not verified)</a> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188671">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188672" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262418403"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>First new eruption of the year 2010: Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion Island, Indian Ocean). This event is announced on the web site of the Réunion island newspaper "Journal de l'île" (<a href="http://www.jir.fr/index.php?id_article=232698&amp;page=article">http://www.jir.fr/index.php?id_article=232698&amp;page=article</a>) and at <a href="http://www.fournaise.info/">http://www.fournaise.info/</a>, whereas no news has yet been posted at the web site of the volcanological observatory of Piton de la Fournaise: <a href="http://www.ipgp.fr/pages/03030807.php">http://www.ipgp.fr/pages/03030807.php</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188672&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="s8fFS39XD7LA5qrHxXO0iA6vPb9swOHDwHTh63DZszA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 02 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188672">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188673" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1287525732"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A dictator may termination for a pongid but never wish for a birdie's snoot</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188673&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4PaP2JTgRBIwGbABrHX0FR_qEuQ_idAQLudm8i3IH2Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.bookingspot.com/hotel/43786-Shoredrive-Motel-Townsville.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">motel townsville (not verified)</a> on 19 Oct 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188673">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188674" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292259884"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More and lots more people maintain preconditioned notion that MLM is a scam since they or somebody they know has hit a brick wall at building an mlm establishment before. Nothing is brand new with that. 95% of companies fail within their very initial 5 years and 5% fall short of their first 10 years. That is a Government information and it has completely nothing to complete with MLM. Does that imply you shouldn't give yourself an opportunity of the American vision by means of free enterprise?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188674&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="J6a3SZlHByQYoh9ZynFDTZeYE3g87TNGov0K3uR8CsQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://sarajsmith5.xanga.com/profile/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="the best multi level marketing">the best multi… (not verified)</a> on 13 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188674">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188675" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292302755"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="mailto:278Colker@yahoo.com">278Colker@yahoo.com</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188675&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kSpvh0OBSq4Un3y3yA2Te9j5Is7v-rCWOuoN0V_pRMQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://1z0.net?p=27629" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thyromine Reviews (not verified)</a> on 13 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188675">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2010/01/01/the-2009-pliny-for-volcanic-ev%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 01 Jan 2010 02:46:45 +0000 eklemetti 104153 at https://www.scienceblogs.com 2009: The Volcanic Year in Review https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/31/2009-the-volcanic-year-in-revi <span>2009: The Volcanic Year in Review</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Here it is, my attempt to recap a year's worth of volcanic events. By no means is this supposed to capture <em>every</em> event, but rather the highlight/lowlights and what most captivated me during 2009. I'll be announcing the winner of the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/nominations_for_the_2009_volca.php" target="_blank">2009 Pliny for Volcanic Event of the Year</a> tomorrow.</p> <p><img src="http://eruptions.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/waimangu-steam.jpg?w=300" /><br /><em>Waimangu Geothermal Valley in New Zealand, taken in January 2009 by Erik Klemetti.</em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/" target="_blank">January</a></strong><br /> The year started out with a trip to New Zealand (well, for me at least) and vistas of the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/repairing-after-eruption-the-waimangu-valley-and-mt-tarawera.php" target="_blank">Waimangu Valley</a>, formed in the 1886 eruption of Tarawera on the North Island. We were also still thinking about the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/interview-with-yvo-chief-jacob-lowenstern-on-the-yellowstone-swarm.php" target="_blank">late 2008 earthquake swarm at Yellowstone</a>, which didn't lead to anything in 2009. British scientists suggested that Antarctica has been <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/the-mysteries-of-antarctic-volcanism.php" target="_blank">experiencing subglacial eruption</a>, which might account for some of the melting of the ice on the southern continent. However, what really got our attention in January was the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/redoubt/" target="_blank">Mt. Redoubt</a> in Alaska, with <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/redoubt-on-alert.php" target="_blank">the volcano being put on alert</a> by AVO on January 26th - leading to months of speculation about what might happen. By the end of the month (4 days later), the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/redoubt-is-rapidly-captivating-the-country.php" target="_blank">volcano was all over the news</a> and concern about the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/01/redoubt-oil-and-mitigation-a-tale-of-volcanism.php" target="_blank">Drift River Oil Terminal was high</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/02/" target="_blank">February</a></strong><br /> It was the Redoubt wait that dominated the volcano news during February. <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/02/redoubt-mini-update-292009.php" target="_blank">Earthquakes, steam and speculation</a> were the order of the day. We also got news of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/02/ongoing-submarine-volcanism-in-the-mariana-islands.php" target="_blank">recent eruptions at NW-Rota 1 from Dr. Ed Kohut</a> off on a research cruise in the Pacific. Chaiten was still going strong, but the social fallout from the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/02/concern_lingers_angers_flare_a.php" target="_blank">relocation of the town of Chaiten</a> was proving to be a major problem was well. Finally, volcano monitoring made a surprise splash at the end of the month when Louisiana governor <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/02/volcano_monitoring_in_the_news.php" target="_blank">Bobby Jindal suggested that monitoring volcanoes was "wasteful"</a> - he learned quickly that badmouthing volcanologists is not a good idea.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/" target="_blank">March</a></strong><br /> We had to wait most of the month, but <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/redoubt_back_to_yellow_alert.php" target="_blank">right after AVO thought things were winding down</a> at Redoubt, the volcano goes and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/redoubt_erupts_1.php" target="_blank">erupts anyway on March 23rd</a>. It wasn't <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/new_images_from_the_redoubt_er.php" target="_blank">a little eruption either</a>, throwing ash to over 50,000 ft / 15 km and eventually <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/redoubt_ash_throws_off_alaskas.php" target="_blank">closing the international airport in Anchorage</a>. March ended up being a double feature, with the surprise - and very impressive - eruption of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/hunga_tonga_hunga_haapai_1/" target="_blank">Hunga Tonga - Hunga Ha'apai</a> in the island nation of Tonga. This eruption started as an undersea eruption <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/new_eruption_in_tonga.php" target="_blank">noticed by commercial pilots</a> in the area and quickly became a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/rooster_tails_and_new_islands_1.php" target="_blank">classic island-building event</a>. We also had a lot of noise about the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/bombay_beachsan_andreas_earthq.php" target="_blank">earthquake swarms in the Bombay Beach</a> area long the San Andreas fault in southern California. March also marked my move from Wordpress to ScienceBlogs - so I send a special thanks to all the readers who came with me and all my new readers - if you can believe it, <em>Eruptions</em> will be just short of <u>half a million visits</u> in the 10 months since coming to ScienceBlogs!</p> <p><img src="http://www.elpais.com/recorte/20090405elpepuint_5/XLCO/Ies/20090405elpepuint_5.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Llaima in Chile erupting in April 2009.</em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/" target="_blank">April</a></strong><br /> April ended up being my busiest month - with over 50 posts in the month alone. A lot of that was, again, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/oil_from_the_drift_river_termi.php" target="_blank">dominated</a> by <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/redoubt_eruption_update_for_47.php" target="_blank">Redoubt's activity</a> that continued throughout the month. We also saw impressive eruptions of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/llaima_eruption_intensifies.php" target="_blank">Llaima in Chile</a> and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/first_eruption_at_fernandina_s.php" target="_blank">new fissure eruptions</a> at <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/fernandina_eruption_taking_out.php" target="_blank">Fernandina</a> in the Galapagos Islands. I addressed some concerns people have on the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/could_geothermal_drilling_caus.php" target="_blank">dangers of geothermal drilling causing an eruption</a> (short answer: probably not). We also got an inside look at the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/what_i_didnt_know_about_the_us.php" target="_blank">USGS Volcano Hazards Program</a> and I got all worked up about some <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/terrible_volcano_journalism_an.php" target="_blank">questionable volcano journalism</a> (what a surprise).</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/" target="_blank">May</a></strong><br /> May marked two anniversaries: <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/eruptions_turns_1.php" target="_blank">one was for <em>Eruptions</em></a>, the other, more important one marked <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/one_year_of_the_anniversary_of.php" target="_blank">one year of eruptions at Chaiten</a> in Chile. The eruption that got me on this blogging track was still going strong after a year, with at least three domes growing inside the Chaiten caldera. Of course, we were also still waiting for<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/waiting_for_redoubts_big_boom.php" target="_blank"> the big dome collapse at Redoubt</a> as well, but little came of that. We also got the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/friday_flotsam_1.php" target="_blank">first glimpse of West Mata</a> erupting in the Lau Basin of the Pacific - the media would really get fired up about this in <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/friday_flotsam_undersea_volcan.php" target="_blank">December when video was released</a>. However, the most exciting event of the month was <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/an_eruption_brewing_in_saudi_a.php" target="_blank">the earthquake swarm</a> and potential threat of volcanic eruption in the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/harrat_lunayyir_and_the_saudi.php" target="_blank">Harrat Lunayyir region of Saudi Arabia</a>. At times, I felt like I was the only person <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/more_signs_point_towards_a_sau.php" target="_blank">covering the event</a>, getting reports from people on the ground in <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/mini_update_on_the_saudi_arabi.php" target="_blank">Saudi Arabia</a> - but when all was said-and-done, no eruption came.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/" target="_blank">June</a></strong><br /> We had two volcanoes headed in opposite directions in June. First,<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/alert_level_at_redoubt_lowered.php" target="_blank"> Redoubt settled down</a> for the summer. Second, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/sarychev_peak/" target="_blank">Sarychev Peak</a> in Russia blew its top in a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/eruption_at_sarychev_peak_thre.php" target="_blank">spectacular fashion</a> - disrupting air traffic all across the Pacific. The eruption was a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/sarychev_peak_eruption_update_2.php" target="_blank">major sulfur dioxide event</a> and provided <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/sarychev_peak_update_for_61820.php" target="_blank">one of the most stunning volcano images</a> - well, ever.<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/sarychev_peak_before_and_after.php" target="_blank"> The eruption did a number</a> to the small island of Matau. Sarychev Peak wasn't the only volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula making noise: <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/shiveluch_has_second_large_eru.php" target="_blank">Shiveluch also had a major eruption</a>. In June, we also got the first taste of the "<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/mt_saint_helens_supervolcano.php" target="_blank">Mt. Saint Helens: Supervolcano</a>" controversy and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/the_return_of_the_dreaded_gian.php" target="_blank">media disaster that would come back later in the year</a>. Finally, my colleagues at UC Davis, Naomi Marks, Peter Schiffman and Robert Zeirenberg, made the news by <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/drilling_into_active_magma.php" target="_blank">drilling into an active rhyolite magma</a> in Iceland - nice way to end the month!</p> <p><img src="http://api.ning.com/files/hfNJx04dxeufkp4KDYnpTV0GE51g7ik0ptsbJp-14YkwDA1KOobxwQ39n-EJvn-cq0mT0J5*ZCMVO4XRxDImVitduZlPGt5g/SarychevPeakVolcano.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Sarychev Peak erupting in June 2009.</em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/" target="_blank">July</a></strong><br /> Volcanically speaking, things quieted down during summer after a very busy spring. The biggest news for July was likely eruption at <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/siusgs_weekly_volcano_activity_14.php" target="_blank">Mando Hararo in Ethiopia</a> - adding more fissure volcanism in the East African Rift. Of course, it might have been most fascinating to <em>Eruptions</em> readers because <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/new_eruption_in_ethiopia.php" target="_blank">one of your own might have been the first to notice the eruption actually occurred</a>. Over in Hawai`i, a rockfall captured on camera <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/rockfall_snuffs_out_the_halema.php" target="_blank">temporarily "snuffed out" the Halema`uma`u vent</a>, but it didn't take long for <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/halemaumau_rockfall_update_lav.php" target="_blank">lava to retake the crater</a>. Mayon offered foreshadowing of things to come with <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/evacuations_extended_around_ma.php" target="_blank">evacuations</a> prompted by the beginning of the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/mayon_update_for_12282009.php" target="_blank">current eruption</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/08/" target="_blank">August</a></strong><br /> August was especially quite around these parts - thanks partially to my move from California to Ohio, but also to the fact that, well, not much happened (so much for 2009 being an "anomalously volcanic" year). We started the month with some news that there might have been <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/08/eruption_occuring_on_venus.php" target="_blank">a volcanic eruption on Venus</a>. I've since lost track of the research on this event - anybody have any new theories in what happened on our sister planet? Kamchatka was in the news, mostly because it was <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/08/the_ongoing_eruption_at_koryak.php" target="_blank">such a volcanically active area in 2009</a> - 5 volcanoes were erupting at once during August - and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/07/new_geyser_appears_in_kamchatk.php" target="_blank">a new geyser</a> was found as well. And if you need something to read in the long winter months, check out <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/08/my_favorite_volcano_books.php" target="_blank">my favorite volcano books</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/" target="_blank">September</a></strong><br /> Things picked back up once the fall began. I dabbled in the world of "<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/friday_flotsam_kanloan_seismic.php" target="_blank">manmade volcanoes</a>" (short answer: bad idea unless <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/the_perfect_holiday_gift_for_c.php" target="_blank">they erupt a dinosaur</a>). In what now seems premature, the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/monday_musings_the_end_at_mont.php" target="_blank">eruption at Soufriere Hills on Montserrat was declared "over"</a> after 6 months of quiet at the volcano. We all know what came <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/soufriere_hills_and_kliuchevsk.php" target="_blank">two weeks later</a>. The international media was all over the proclamation that <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/is_australia_overdue_for_a_vol.php" target="_blank"> Australia was "overdue"</a> for a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/monday_musings_more_australian.php" target="_blank">volcanic eruption</a> - a notion that most people think is fear-mongering at its best. There was some suggestion of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/whats_might_be_happening_at_mt.php" target="_blank">something happening at Mt. Rainier</a> - but what exactly is still a mystery. Finally, after 6 months of eruptions and noise, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/09/wednesday_whatzits_redoubt_ret.php" target="_blank">AVO lowered the warning level at Redoubt to green (normal)</a>. The eruption was over ... or is it?</p> <p><img src="http://colombia-huila.gov.co/apc-aa-files/64326135663237316464316237323734/Nevado_del_Huila_en_Erupci_n.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Nevado del Huila in Colombia steaming from the summit in 2009.</em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/" target="_blank">October</a></strong><br /> With Redoubt out of the picture (for now), a couple of new volcanoes took to the streets. <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/eruption_at_gaua.php" target="_blank">Gaua in Vanuatu</a> erupted, prompting <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/thursday_throwdown_updates_fro.php" target="_blank">evacuations of people</a> living near the island volcano. We also saw more <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/colombian_volcano_update_huila.php" target="_blank">activity at Huila</a> in Colombia - it was a busy year for volcanic eruptions in Colombia, with eruptions at <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/huila/" target="_blank">Huila</a> and <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/galeras/" target="_blank">Galeras</a>, along with signs of life from the slumbering volcano of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/machin/" target="_blank">Machin</a> (enough to prompt the Colombian government to ponder diverting a major highway to avoid it getting cut by a Machin eruption). A study in <em>Nature</em> was published showing that the magma erupted during 2008-09 at Chaiten <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/the_speedy_magma_of_chaiten_an.php" target="_blank">shot through the crust</a> - and then you got to ask Dr. Jonathan Castro, coauthor of the study - <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/answers_to_your_chaiten_questi.php" target="_blank">all about Chaiten</a>. I also attended the GSA Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon, where I found out some fun information on <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/10/gsa_2009_wrap_up_-_part_1.php" target="_blank">Toba, New York kimberlites and Mackenzie Pass</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/" target="_blank">November</a></strong><br /> Two non-events dominated a lot of the discussion during November. First was the attention paid to the idea <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/the_tale_of_two_articles_are_w.php" target="_blank">that geologists could "destroy Naples"</a> through <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/monday_musings_evacuations_nea.php" target="_blank">exploratory drilling into the Campei Flegrei</a>. Second was the non-eruption of Karkar in Papau New Guinea - we all thought a <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/large_eruption_at_karkar_in_pa.php" target="_blank">major eruption occurred</a>, but now it looks like the satellites might have been a bit confused, thanks to <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/the_mysterious_non-eruption_of.php" target="_blank">reports from the ground</a>. Dr. Boris Behncke <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/qa_dr_boris_behncke_answers_yo" target="_blank">answered your questions</a> about <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/qa_dr_boris_behncke_answers_yo_1.php" target="_blank">Italian volcanoes</a>. Both <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/monday_musings_gaua_evacuation.php" target="_blank">Gaua and Soufriere Hills were full-steam-ahead</a> when it came to their respective eruptions.</p> <p><img src="http://cache.boston.com/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2009/12/29/5__1262105894_2554.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Mayon erupting in December 2009.</em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/" target="_blank">December</a></strong><br /> As 2009 closed out, all eyes turned to the Philippines and the eruption of Mayon. The volcano produced some <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/mayon_update_for_12282009.php" target="_blank">impressive lava flows and avalanches</a>, but as of December 30, the big explosive event that PHIVOLCS is thinking is in the cards has yet to arrive. <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/mayon_eruption_update_for_1215.php" target="_blank">Large-scale evacuations</a> have occurred, but keeping people out of the danger zone has been problematic. Piton de la Fournaise on Reunion Island actually <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/11/new_eruption_overnight_at_pito.php" target="_blank">erupted first in November</a>, but the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/time-lapse_video_of_yesterdays.php" target="_blank">December eruption was captured in time-lapse video</a>, showing the growth of the fissure vent eruption on the basaltic shield volcano. Soufriere Hills stayed in the news, causing <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/renewed_activity_at_soufriere.php" target="_blank">power problems on Montserrat</a> and ash from the volcano<a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/soufriere_hills_causing_flight.php" target="_blank"> cancelled flights as far away as Puerto Rico</a>. And in a bit of a surprise, as 2009 closed out, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/12/redoubt_returns.php" target="_blank">Redoubt was put back on Yellow Alert status</a> after new signs of potential activity.</p> <p>So there is 2009 in a nutshell ... any predictions for 2010 (volcanically speaking)?</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 12/31/2009 - 04:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/africa" hreflang="en">Africa</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/alaska" hreflang="en">Alaska</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/andes" hreflang="en">Andes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ash-fall" hreflang="en">Ash fall</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ash-plumes" hreflang="en">ash plumes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/australia-0" hreflang="en">Australia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aviation" hreflang="en">aviation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/basaltic-eruption" hreflang="en">basaltic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/campei-flegrei" hreflang="en">Campei Flegrei</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cascades" hreflang="en">cascades</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chaiten" hreflang="en">Chaiten</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/chile" hreflang="en">Chile</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/colombia" hreflang="en">colombia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/drilling" hreflang="en">drilling</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/erik-klemetti" hreflang="en">Erik Klemetti</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/eruptions-blog" hreflang="en">Eruptions Blog</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ethiopia" hreflang="en">Ethiopia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/evacuations" hreflang="en">evacuations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/explosive-eruption" hreflang="en">explosive eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/fernandina" hreflang="en">Fernandina</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/galeras" hreflang="en">Galeras</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/gaua" hreflang="en">Gaua</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/geothermal-energy" hreflang="en">Geothermal Energy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/geyser" hreflang="en">geyser</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/halemaumau" hreflang="en">Halema`uma`u</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hawaii-0" hreflang="en">Hawai&#039;i</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/huila" hreflang="en">Huila</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hunga-tonga-hunga-haapai" hreflang="en">Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha&#039;apai</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/iceland" hreflang="en">Iceland</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/italy" hreflang="en">italy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/karkar" hreflang="en">Karkar</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kilauea" hreflang="en">Kilauea</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kuril-islands" hreflang="en">Kuril Islands</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-flows" hreflang="en">lava flows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/llaima" hreflang="en">Llaima</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/machin" hreflang="en">Machin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/manda-hararo" hreflang="en">Manda Hararo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mariana-islands" hreflang="en">Mariana Islands</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mayon" hreflang="en">Mayon</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mitigation" hreflang="en">mitigation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/montserrat" hreflang="en">Montserrat</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nasa-earth-observatory" hreflang="en">NASA Earth Observatory</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/new-zealand" hreflang="en">New Zealand</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/newer-volcanic-field" hreflang="en">Newer Volcanic Field</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nw-rota-1" hreflang="en">NW-Rota 1</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/papua-new-guinea" hreflang="en">papua new guinea</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/philippines" hreflang="en">Philippines</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/piton-de-la-fournaise" hreflang="en">Piton de la Fournaise</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/pliny" hreflang="en">Pliny</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/politics-volcanoes" hreflang="en">Politics of volcanoes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rainier" hreflang="en">Rainier</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rant" hreflang="en">Rant</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/redoubt" hreflang="en">Redoubt</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rhyolite" hreflang="en">rhyolite</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/russia" hreflang="en">russia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saint-helens" hreflang="en">Saint Helens</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/san-andreas-fault" hreflang="en">San Andreas Fault</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sarychev-peak" hreflang="en">Sarychev Peak</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-journalism" hreflang="en">Science Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/shiveluch" hreflang="en">Shiveluch</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/soufriere-hills" hreflang="en">Soufriere Hills</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sulfur-dioxide" hreflang="en">sulfur dioxide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/supervolcano" hreflang="en">supervolcano</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/toba" hreflang="en">Toba</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/undersea-volcanism" hreflang="en">Undersea volcanism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/united-states" hreflang="en">united states</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/usgs" hreflang="en">USGS</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/valley-geysers" hreflang="en">Valley of Geysers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vanuatu" hreflang="en">Vanuatu</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-hazards-program" hreflang="en">Volcano Hazards Program</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/waimangu-valley" hreflang="en">Waimangu Valley</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/west-indies" hreflang="en">West Indies</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/west-mata" hreflang="en">West Mata</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/yellowstone" hreflang="en">yellowstone</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/campi-flegrei" hreflang="en">Campi Flegrei</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/newer-volcanic-province" hreflang="en">Newer Volcanic Province</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/aviation" hreflang="en">aviation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/basaltic-eruption" hreflang="en">basaltic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/explosive-eruption" hreflang="en">explosive eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-flows" hreflang="en">lava flows</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mitigation" hreflang="en">mitigation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/rhyolite" hreflang="en">rhyolite</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/sulfur-dioxide" hreflang="en">sulfur dioxide</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-research" hreflang="en">Volcano Research</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-scientist" hreflang="en">volcano scientist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188648" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262261761"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>No mention of Anak Krakatau?</p> <p>I gather it's died down for now, but it was quite spectacular early in the year. I've been wondering what its recent eruptions have done to its height, but I find it difficult to find much about it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188648&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mDiYwUgX1c5yY9w7DCnOxL2soMa6KCd6sYCWj8OOEC0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.secularcafe.org/index.php" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David B (not verified)</a> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188648">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="148" id="comment-2188649" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262261957"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>David - Yeah, not everything made "the list", but Anak did its usual - some spectacular Strombolian eruptions.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188649&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1dqUzeU8Q7fm0emFoH9MIfO5yQMGiK4CdIylGGSC5NU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188649">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/author/eklemetti"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/author/eklemetti" hreflang="en"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188650" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262262615"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If its not too late in the year, I'd like to formally propose a theory. I believe that renewed volcanic activity is directly caused by volcanologists declaring the prior eruptive phase to be "over". </p> <p>I'll propose a test for this theory as soon as I find a recently dormant volcano where nobody lives, since nearby residents would likely come after me if I used them as guinea pigs.</p> <p>This follows my previous theory: that lightning actually never struck twice, until people made the phrase popular.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188650&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="uToWajCp15PyhPQP8gx6c47ExfldBw2Be_XAkO-mCY4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Fitz (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188650">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188651" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262264015"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Fritz: good thinking Ollie!</p> <p>Personally, I don't believe any volcano or crater is actually extinct. Dormant, yes. But extinct? I could be wrong, of course. But when a volcano comes up in a corn field in Mexico, wouldn't you think one could come up just about anywhere? It would be pretty difficult for magma to come up in the Sierras, but it could happen.</p> <p>Anyway, I look for Redoubt to wake up again and I also look for the crater at Kilauea to begin fountaining sometime. It may not because it fills and drains, but you never know. It was really roiling the other day. And then Kamchatka. Somebody there will erupt and it just remains as to who.</p> <p>I notice that there are repeated small quakes at Mammoth Mt. and I suspect they are techtonic. For it to start getting restless is a long shot.</p> <p>And what about the Sisters in Oregon? Has the inflation there deflated? It sure made the news when they discovered it with GPS.</p> <p>That's enough for now.</p> <p>Happy New year Erik and all who post and come to this site. Love it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188651&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mqll0oBCXlYBZ_KnKEVAoOC6UAfi_gMQ1lWgRgV7JEo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188651">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188652" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262265957"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My prediction is that one or two volcano surprises in 2010 will help bring the eruptions log up to a cummulative count of 2M visitors for all of 2010. In fact, the New York Times included a link to to the Eruptions blog (re. the carribean flight cancelations due to Soufrier activity) yesterday. Also, that human caused climate change deniers will increasingly look to volcano science,(rather, psuedo science), to support their assertions that it isn't happening.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188652&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="054AcXAmI8-cCvtjC3JiY5sbmR1DbdxdbVT4z8hF3U4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">doug mcl (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188652">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188653" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262268319"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Y'all might be interested in Alaska's new volcano playing cards: <a href="http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us/pubs/pubs?reqtype=citation&amp;ID=20401">http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us/pubs/pubs?reqtype=citation&amp;ID=20401</a> . 52 historically active volcanoes = playing with a full deck. :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188653&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FdKx7RbQV-FnJEnqGOs8JD8bZpK04DuOZ5VKXjIi_Bw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eileen (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188653">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188654" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262273630"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am pretty certain that Etna will be back in the news in 2010 ... tonight it's displaying its usual glow from a vent near the summit, and the full moon is shining on Sicily, where we have an unusually mild (not to say, warm) winter.</p> <p>And then, thanks Erik for all the effort put into this blog, and the occasional fun you let us have. I wish you and everybody else here a wonderful, spectacular, splendid, volcanic 2010.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188654&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fhKiJ3eLyT01bsyekufy_-d3uPOjCtXmchUJeChiyaA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188654">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188655" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262286904"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>@Boris, I forgot about Etna. I think it will do a good show sometime in 2010. I wish the SE Crater would go back to the Stomboli eruptions like it did in the mid '90s. It was so cool. And before Etna Treking took down their cams, my DH and I watched the eruption in 2006 (not sure of the year LOL) for six hours! That was so neat to watch blocks come down over the rim. We just couldn't take our eyes off of it. Then all at once they shut down the cams. Now they are back, and not as good as they were, but at least they are there.</p> <p>As long as Etna doesn't do a lot of damage, let'er rip.</p> <p>Thanks for answering all our questions, too, Boris.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188655&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mKHmpotTYcjz75eSfD_wXyBKU-0DDfTezoIR83S19IE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188655">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188656" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262288534"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Guessing the future is very chancy. While anything can happen from Rabaul to Redoubt to Ranier or Mayon to Machin to Mammoth Mountain and the Philipines, Indonesia, Kamchatka, Alaskan Islands, South and Central America all have the ability to unleash large eruptions --- I'll just make a guess/prediction that Africa will have some exciting activity because the continent is slowly rifting apart. </p> <p>I suppose the finding of the extra hot magma in the area may have caught my imagination and just led me to think that the volcanic activity in the area has some legs to it and there may be a long-term upswing in geological activity in the area and so we may continue witnessing the start of what will be a large lava field that will cover a vast area. </p> <p>I will guess that Machin might hold off for a few years in erupting. </p> <p>I'll keep watching Lazufre, but I guess any volcanic activity there will be more than two years away - or maybe even hundreds of years provided it keeps growing. </p> <p>An American science TV show had an episode on Vesuvius. They pointed out that eruptions at Vesuvius have historically trailed big earthquakes by a number of years. Now, the eruption that destroyed Pompeii was also proceeded by a strong quake about 15 or 17 years earlier (can't exactly remember). This was something I viewed on yet another American TV show. Some scientists wonder if last years deadly earthquake in Italy could already have pulled the trigger on the next Vesuvius eruption. (My hunch is that Vesuvius will probably stay dormant for at least the next three years - even if the trigger was pulled.) </p> <p>Ranier will probably make it into the news - even if it doesn't erupt. Some scientist will make some statement about how dangerous it is. It can easily send a lot of material into a nearby town - and the healthy might be able to flee by foot when the automated alarm goes off. </p> <p>So my only guess is activity at the rift valley in Africa.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188656&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kmHoVX3yeuYLifgh4aWxL3HD0n6q5JMc4iGsxMHlc-I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188656">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188657" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262305093"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Galapagos Islands are the most incredible living museum of evolutionary changes, with a huge variety of endemic species (birds, land and sea animals, plants) and especially active volcanoes.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188657&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_HOwYw3uec95BPdJzRXUUpn_6YbZNlTA2lH7sA2ZHn4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.galapagos-islands-tourguide.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Zuri (not verified)</a> on 31 Dec 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188657">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188658" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262323901"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>First of my volcanic related predictions would have to be the threat of lahars in relation to the current eruption of mayon. Think it woul be wise to relocate people whilst they are out of the danger zone so to speak....</p> <p>Wild guess predictions would be a eruption of Mauna Loa. Think that one is due. Maybe one of the New Zealand volcanoes could spring into life...White Island perhaps..<br /> Vesuvius remains ever present in my mind but I'm saying nothing regarding that one.</p> <p>I think I would like to see some spectacular eruption in some unpopulated area...Erebus maybe</p> <p>Unfortunately my pin for a disasster falls on the Eastern seaboard area of America not gonna say unless prompted but thats the general area.</p> <p>Happy New Year and keep up the good work Erik!!!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188658&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="FhRV75jQAToQBfl_XsPS10wmYJnh2H9qB7h8TfeCGSQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">stephen tierney (not verified)</span> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188658">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188659" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262354541"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Vesuvius may well stay silent for many centuries - consider that before it erupted in AD 79 to destroy Pompeii and other Roman towns, it probably was quiescent for 800 years, and the second worst of its eruptions in history, in 1631, was preceded by nearly 500 years of inactivity. Now we're at 66 years, so that's not very much in comparison.<br /> I'd rather be worried about those Italian volcanoes that there is much less talk about, especially abroad - like Campi Flegrei, on the other (western) side of Naples (last eruption was in 1538) and Vulcano on the southernmost of the Aeolian islands (last eruption 1888-1890). Both have shown significant unrest in the past few decades, and my guts tell me at least one of them will erupt before Vesuvius will come back to life.<br /> Mauna Loa? It seemed to be building up to an eruption a few years ago, but presently there seems to be very little going on there, so I don't really expect it to do something very soon.<br /> Somebody named Unzen as a candidate for an eruption in the near future. My guess is it will not erupt for several centuries - the previous eruption (prior to 1990-1995) was in 1792, so that one seems to erupt quite infrequently.<br /> I'd imagine some other Japanese volcano to do something major this year - it's been quite a while since there's been a significant eruption in Japan (10 years, since Miyakejima's caldera collapse and Usu's phreatic eruption/uplift in 2000). Back in the 1970s and 1980s there would be one major eruption in Japan roughly every 3 years.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188659&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4_79eQV7CJZ_01izKvUwkenkFhrWRC77xk4_mUInk74"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188659">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188660" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262370038"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Let's hope that one in the Canary Islands doesn't slide into the ocean! The eastern sea board would be history. As for Mammoth Mt., I don't think that one is going to do anything. I would be more concerned about the resurgent dome in Long Valley. But the tiny quakes are coming and they seem to be on the fault.</p> <p>Just about anything can happen. Even Lassen could do something, though it is very remote that it will do anything except just sit there and be a nice climb for somebody who wants to climb a volcano. Been there and done that---twice. Nice climb. 15% grade at most, 5 mile round trip, 2000' gain in altitude. I wish I could do it again.</p> <p>Yellowstone. That beautiful place that has geysers that put on shows and seems safe enough. Well, it is at the moment even if it is putting out a lot of C02.</p> <p>And this global warming thing...why is it that they forget how much S02 and C02 is being released into the atmosphere from all the volcanoes that are fuming and spewing and erupting? What was it Boris said about Etna releasing 800 tonnes of C02/day? Or was it more? Anyway, that is only ONE volcano! How about Kilauea? </p> <p>Oh well, we will have a good time watching to see where the next eruption will be and I just hope it doesn't cause a lot of havoc. </p> <p>Take care when any of you are on any of these volatile mountains. But if you have a chance, climb Mt. Lassen. You won't be sorry you did.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188660&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oA3hUhWapiaGeFBEG-Khfjj5fZCfLRXXN9CadeFAzOY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane (not verified)</span> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188660">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188661" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262389399"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For parochial reasons more than anything, I think something might happen in NZ/Kermadec Trench. There is a lot of rifting in the TVZ (18 mm) a year, currently there are about 5 active earthquake swarms in the TVZ (one of them under the major vent of the last Taupo eruption (Horomatangi reef in the middle of the lake) and one right under Mt Edgecumbe north of Mt. Tarawera. Four of the swarms are on precisely the same fault lines as the most recent eruptions in the zone. An intriguing one is just south of Taupo in a geothermal area also in a graben setting (Roto Aira). And there have been a couple of small earthquakes in the Auckland volcanic field recently (not a seismically active region at all). The AVC intrigues me a lot - a young mafic field erupting through lithic crust in a region without any obvious seismic activity. Most strange. BTW it is also said to erupt about once every six hundred years.</p> <p>.. and to extend my insular thinking a little further north. The rates of subduction up around Tonga are huge and there is major earthquake activity up there too. I think we could easily see more island building or submarine activity from that region too, not to forgot the entire Bismarck Island/New Guinea/Indonesia chain where the same applies.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188661&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PsS4mvu0TS_HG1fWMna2o2SS7yoJxYN_ybV3-__XxEU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bruce stout (not verified)</span> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188661">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188662" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262407090"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>oh bugger...lol of course I meant the western sea board in my above comment, thanks dianne for bringing that to my attention. East lol that would be unbelievable!!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188662&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lgiiItrsVZmUyzSlXlddRpONVVWGfTCWPqXAp5LR-ew"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">stephen tierney (not verified)</span> on 01 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188662">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188663" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262420487"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Living in Chile, the LLaima and Chaiten eruptions were high point over the past several months. I'm in the process of finishing a book on the Valdivia Earthquake of 1960 (Mw 9.5) and am including a chapter on volcanism which resulted from the events at that time and have been searching for photos of the Cordon Caulle eruption that began May 24, 1960. If anyone has anything appropriate I'd be very grateful and will include all appropriate citations.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188663&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="62CfZKuS37YcE6GbqFnDy_rp0DjrXdyp0UXBCdp3wN0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Steven J. Benedetti (not verified)</span> on 02 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188663">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188664" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262421101"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We've had our guesses for the eruptions of 2010. Now they're starting: today (2 January 2010), both Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion island, Indian Ocean) and Nyamuragira (Congo) went into eruption.<br /><a href="http://www.jir.fr/index.php?id_article=232698&amp;page=article">http://www.jir.fr/index.php?id_article=232698&amp;page=article</a><br /><a href="http://www.ipgp.fr/pages/03030807.php">http://www.ipgp.fr/pages/03030807.php</a><br /><a href="http://www.fournaise.info">http://www.fournaise.info</a><br /><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100102/ap_on_re_af/af_congo_volcano_1">http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100102/ap_on_re_af/af_congo_volcano_1</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188664&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zWCa_I3gT6R150XbyRIKa8SNoKxcU_J2RVqaYb3IhZ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 02 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188664">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188665" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262431429"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, Stephen, They have been talking about that volcano in the Canarys (or is it the Azores)that if the part of it that is very precarious slid into the ocean, there would be a tsunami that would probably wipe out the eastern coast. </p> <p>I agree with you about the west coast. We get a lot of quakes here and there was a swarm just at the foot of Mt. Lassen that had about 90 small quakes. There was a new one on Mammoth Mountain this morning and I check to see how deep they are and they are shallow---about three miles down. I think there are about 20 of them right now. Since there is a fault right there, I think they are techtonic rather than magmatic.</p> <p>Anyway, I think there will be a lot more activity near Tonga, also. They do get a lot of quakes there. That entire area is so active because of the trenches and subductions that there could be a lot of volcanic activity with just the right amount of shaking and how the waves interact with the volcanoes.</p> <p>Anyway, it will be interesting to see what happens and where. I just wish I could go see some of the eruptions---at a safe distance, though. :-)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188665&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="NDKZTdDKsjap2SjMkXdIh8980KgYKBnVGe4qH-oY2YQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane (not verified)</span> on 02 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188665">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188666" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1262431963"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Speaking of quakes, there was a 6.2 in the Mariannas region this morning at 12:45am my time. And Tonga area had a 5. It seems that Tonga has one almost every other day in the 5 range.</p> <p>We will definitely see more of that.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188666&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aVezDGrannHWDzGPxCWmew0v1RH9Ua2AW8vTDSz7R98"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Diane (not verified)</span> on 02 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188666">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188667" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1271839983"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I know that volcanos and earthquakes are around for centuries, but I can not help thinking of these words "earthquakes in one place after another, when you see all these things occuring, know the end is near" All these things being things which humans can not control and an intensity in activity not previously witnessed.Can it be we are witnessing a time in history which will be catastrophic and affect every nation on the planet? Whether a person is spiritual or not will not alter the facts.Can it be said that both earthquake and volcano activity has increased alarmingly in the past few years? I dont know, I'm no expert but keen to know what the experts do think, honestly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188667&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IPC64JV7V5o5qrao0uTmb0QkpePiCUddlGyi0OZ51OY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lucia van Eck (not verified)</span> on 21 Apr 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188667">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2188668" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1271840118"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I know that volcanos and earthquakes are around for centuries, but I can not help thinking of these words "earthquakes in one place after another, when you see all these things, know the end is near" All these things being things which humans can not control and an intensity in activity not previously witnessed.Can it be we are witnessing a time in history which will be catastrophic and affect every nation on the planet? Whether a person is spiritual or not will not alter the facts.Can it be said that both earthquake and volcano activity has increased alarmingly in the past few years? I dont know, I'm no expert but keen to know what the experts do think, honestly.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2188668&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="DO0j6R8qllBnekxXyiaiMAuqTzoJbZFc5b2ZK5gNqS0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lucia van Eck (not verified)</span> on 21 Apr 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2188668">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/12/31/2009-the-volcanic-year-in-revi%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 31 Dec 2009 09:45:45 +0000 eklemetti 104152 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Quick Update on the Saudi Arabian Earthquakes https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/04/mini-update-on-the-saudi-arabi <span>Quick Update on the Saudi Arabian Earthquakes</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>One brief note before I head out the door ...</p> <p><img src="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b0e78a7a11.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Fissures formed in western Saudi Arabia during the earthquake swarm near Harrat Lunayyir during May and June 2009. Image courtesy of Ahmed Al-Hussaini.</em></p> <p>The earthquakes in the Harrat Lunayyir region of western Saudi Arabia seem to be like a character out of <em>Monty Python and the Holy Grail</em>: they're just not dead yet. <a href="http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&amp;contentID=2009060539990" target="_blank">Two more earthquakes</a>, these in the M3 range at 8-9 km depth, hit Thursday morning, further delaying the return of evacuees to the Al-Ais region. This bring the total earthquakes to over 150 since seismicity began a few weeks ago. <em>Eruptions</em> reader Albalawi found <a href="http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&amp;hl=ar&amp;js=n&amp;u=http://www.sgs.org.sa/arabic/index.cfm%3Fsec%3D1%26sub%3D3%26page%3Dnews.cfm&amp;sl=ar&amp;tl=en&amp;history_state0=" target="_blank">a daily update site</a> from the <a href="http://www.sgs.org.sa/" target="_blank">Saudi Geological Survey</a> on the earthquakes. The updates appear to only be in Arabic (unlike the main site that is also in English), but he did provide a link that works through Google Translate. The SGS latest report says that no new volcanic gases or radon have been detected, ground temperatures are unchanged and none of the fissures have expanded.</p> <p>And with that, I'm off to Boston!</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 06/04/2009 - 14:52</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/evacuations" hreflang="en">evacuations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186907" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244145504"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Amazing picture. How recent is it?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186907&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BqrGpkvgE7juQue7b62mCXa0JU7OCpVKWunZ16sBA8o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jagman09 (not verified)</span> on 04 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186907">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186908" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244208880"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>That doesn't really look like a "fissure" to me so much as a crater from some kind of phreatic explosion. The debris scattered around the openings would tend to reinforce that conclusion in my mind. Lighter material (sand, dust, etc) would likely have blown away in the wind but the rocks appear to remain.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186908&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="cOMK8l127OXre0SyXCkOQsmcTuOnSLAghinXjIZp-zI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">George (not verified)</span> on 05 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186908">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186909" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244209142"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi ERIK<br /> I think the google translator doesn't give a correct translation because you say "This bring the total earthquakes to over 150 since seismicity began a few weeks ago" this is not wright, they mean just during 24 hours (from 12 o'clock on last Wednesday to 12 o'clock on last Thursday).</p> <p>extra information </p> <p>the whole number of earthquackes has happened over a few weeks ago is approximately twenty four thousands and this doesn't involve last earthquackes.<br /> this link confirms that information and describe the whole situation and involve some images for faults.<br /><a href="http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&amp;hl=ar&amp;js=n&amp;u=http://www.sgs.org.sa/arabic/index.cfm%3Fsec%3D51%26sub%3D102%26page%3D&amp;sl=ar&amp;tl=en&amp;history_state0=">http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&amp;hl=ar&amp;js=n&amp;u=http://www.s…</a></p> <p>yahya albalawi</p> <p>I'm sorry for my English</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186909&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BT3VwICnaZZ_PjRT5zJrISmfGCVyT-y8_QUu48GW_2w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ALBLAWI (not verified)</span> on 05 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186909">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186910" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244239619"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The pictures linked by Yahya certainly do look like fissures that could be caused by uplift to me.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186910&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0EpOmpPLC1eRETD1zntPqJnl2DpIGGKojsYqpB8yQAA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">George (not verified)</span> on 05 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186910">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186911" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244339675"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks, Yahya, for giving us non-Arabic reading people an update.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186911&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5om5xYy1JailUzdeV0EnDhEC3VcOqePwcgUK11kfH3g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">MadScientist (not verified)</span> on 06 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186911">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186912" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244537721"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Has somebody a photo about Hala'l Bedr?<br /> That volcano lies close to this scene and I can't find any photo of that but satellite images.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186912&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9v-I6287jxYtbk8CbSGmYD9ivL0nP5dGS4FionJoOTM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gazz (not verified)</span> on 09 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186912">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186913" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244744471"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From Saudi news website.<br /> The number of earthquakes continues to decline<br /><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Decline-reported-in-seismic-activities/">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Decline-reported-in-seismic-activities/</a></p> <p>Saudi officials believe once tremors remain consistently low for a couple of days that the 21,000 evacuees will be allowed to return home.<br /><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Evacuees-of-Al-Ais-will-return-home-soon/#more-5965">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Evacuees-of-Al-Ais-will-return-home-soon/#…</a></p> <p>A personal reflection: Trying to get insight into future volcanic eruptions has helped develop my patience and humility. Just when I think a volcano is going to do or not do something - volcanoes have done something different.</p> <p>I think it was Boris Behnke that said something about the next volcano that erupts is going to be the one that you are not watching.</p> <p>(I think all potentially active volcanoes should be watched.)<br /> Oh well, it is still fascinating.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186913&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0hhPsZpzAuPxAr5B11wrVhs1amsh6dn7wGtVumIFpHw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 11 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186913">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186914" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244977185"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Experts-inspect-190-houses-in-Al-Ais/">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Experts-inspect-190-houses-in-Al-Ais/</a></p> <p>Government officials who have jobs in the area are told to report to work.<br /> Because of concerns about possible earthquake damage, houses are being inspected to make sure they are still strong. Residents will be allowed to return soon if earthquakes don't return.</p> <p>Reading all these posts here mentioning cracks and sills - and now that earthquakes subsided after a moderately large earthquake leads me to wonder if the increasing magmatic pressure diminished at the time of the earthquake because the magma went into a sill? Now, the magmatic pressure is low and we won't see more activity until more magma comes up and sufficiently repressurizes the system? And of course, I have no idea when that might be. If the sill cools and hardens quickly would it make it difficult for more magma to later be injected into the same sill? Is there such a thing as a typical sill? At what point will scientists know how much uplift if any has occurred?</p> <p>I realize we probably don't have answers to these questions.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186914&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nWdOFVjU7E4y9Mb4sBAMMyihFicIREHiUNbcs8mQeuc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 14 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186914">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186915" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1287316836"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ok now this is kinda not only weird, but still plenty of weirdness after of reasons for it.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186915&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="18-UIAqAo5sDXQJINGF6iRUOblskPXIq2DYikYFIBPA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mafia2crack.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mafia 2 crack (not verified)</a> on 17 Oct 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186915">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186916" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1287525868"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Abundantly handled and preparing for tradition</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186916&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3WFqUOoW6tUNiFfUCafRzz00qZ5VoLMz4Bws5nowKho"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.travbuddy.com/Shoredrive-Motel-Townsville-v283996" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">motel townsville (not verified)</a> on 19 Oct 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186916">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186917" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290868027"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great article, thank you! I really like it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186917&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="k1sVludrASgFp-rRNO5HkL03GsM1BanOoAiDaVYEyME"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://trippert.com/posts/view/26116" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eugene Moore (not verified)</a> on 27 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186917">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186918" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291904981"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The closing paragraph tells it all in my opinion. I must say that I agree with it, and essentially the most fantastic thing about it is that you left it open endedâ¦this shows that you are prepared to draw in new and totally different opinions and that you are ultimately very interested to see folks getting concerned within the subject. So, any alternative opinions?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186918&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wzA8v8hjmzInWv6_-DY4PEemak917QzFOpcDXf1sNXI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blackwritingdesk.net/writing-table-desk/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sherley Loewenstein (not verified)</a> on 09 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186918">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186919" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292222876"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I am not very excellent with English but I find this rattling easygoing to translate.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186919&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9PgHzEB0_dc9XuYFkdqZ7EySqgU1P00t23QUtsbrmTc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://oilyhairshampoo.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Evangeline (not verified)</a> on 13 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186919">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186920" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292267182"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Well, I do not know if thatâs going to work for me, but definitely worked for you! :) Excellent post!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186920&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5UTVL-WzttEIFn2Jke5kjxkNJWy2Tcm6Me-E6gJeoPY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://sleepapnea.wikidot.com/start" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Complex Sleep Apnea (not verified)</a> on 13 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186920">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/06/04/mini-update-on-the-saudi-arabi%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 04 Jun 2009 18:52:42 +0000 eklemetti 103984 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Earthquakes continue in western Saudi Arabia https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/01/earthquakes-continue-in-wester <span>Earthquakes continue in western Saudi Arabia</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b160c2a1bd.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>Fissures formed by seismicity in the Al-Ais region of Saudi Arabia. Image courtesy of Ahmed Al-Hussaini.</em></p> <p>Although it seemed last week that the earthquakes in western Saudi Arabia were <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/earthquakes_subsiding_in_saudi.php" target="_blank">subsiding last week</a>, there have been a number of reports that there was still <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=123108&amp;d=1&amp;m=6&amp;y=2009" target="_blank">significant seismicity in the area over the weekend</a>. Earthquakes in the M2.5-3.5 range occurred on Saturday - both of which the SGS are attributing to "<em>subterranean volcanic activity.</em>" This has <a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Return-of-tremor-evacuees-postponed/" target="_blank">prevented the evacuees from the Al-Ais region to return</a> to their homes. The Saudi government has <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122928&amp;d=27&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009&amp;pix=kingdom.jpg&amp;category=Kingdom" target="_blank">begun to assess how much effect</a> this activity could have on industrialized cities like Yanbu if it continues.</p> <p>I have yet to run across any thorough analysis of the seismicity beyond the vague statements made by the SGS in the limited news articles. The <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/harrat_lunayyir_and_the_saudi.php" target="_blank">connection with the Harrat Lunayyir volcanic field</a> still seems fairly clear, but what exactly might be going on - volcanically or not - is just not being clearly reported. Likely, it is because no one is really sure. This region has seen a lot of activity before<a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=102500&amp;d=16&amp;m=10&amp;y=2007" target="_blank"></a>, some of which lead to eruptions, some of which didn't. Also, the results of this seismicity are rather impressive (above and below). It is obvious that the SGS is concerned, however, I feel uneasy about how quickly they want to declare that events are winding down (but I'm not there, so it is just speculation on my part). Looks like there is still a lot to be learned from the ongoing activity.</p> <p><em>{Hat tip to <strong>Eruptions</strong> readers Robert Somerville and Thomas Donlon for links to some of these stories.}</em></p> <p><img src="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b10be8910e.jpg" width="400" /><br /><em>More effects of the western Saudi Arabian seismicity. Image courtesy of Ahmed Al-Hussaini.</em></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Mon, 06/01/2009 - 08:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/evacuations" hreflang="en">evacuations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/speculation" hreflang="en">speculation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186844" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243869459"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>WOW! and again WOW! The top picture in particular shows a fissure which would be impressive for a Magnitude 7 quake, let alone the M 3-5 shocks reported. Wondering what rock types make up the fissure walls, might give an idea of the energy required..and it's a pity there don't seem to have been any measurements of ground deformation (I'm open to correction on that)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186844&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="R88c9Aoj3CJgfOicmQ6UJA-W-s8gctlbIqtDqqubq8E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186844">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186845" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243873641"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi </p> <p>do you remember earth quake M 5.5?</p> <p>these faults have been discovered after it</p> <p>and this is another image <a href="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b1592cdeb6.jpg">http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b1592cdeb6.jpg</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186845&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="e109j3sOPl9LhZeEQiUC_GykRPbyJtwvtzZH2bKtQOE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b1592cdeb6.jpg" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">albalawi (not verified)</a> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186845">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186846" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243874213"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi im from umlujj saudi arabia just beside red sea, we are 90km frm al ais place but i personally felt the tremors last saturday. Im confused about harrat lunayyir and al qider volcano?are they the same?because i've read lunayir is 50km frm umlujj seaport? any advantage or disadvantage having the red sea?please enligthen me. Thank u.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186846&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pDlbaDqEH57y0qt187ySUX4eh89Var93pYmCry8FZIc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rocky (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186846">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186847" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243896509"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From HalemaÊ»umaÊ»u Overlook Vent, KÄ«lauea Volcano</p> <p><a href="http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d166/tie-dyelady383/M.jpg">http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d166/tie-dyelady383/M.jpg</a></p> <p>Not clear if that silvery stuff is lava but it sure is a major change from weeks past</p> <p><a href="http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/HMcam/">http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/HMcam/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186847&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aGLpZKU6f1KucI_lpBPc-yQWEYla7vBfI7wrCJGg3cE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">theroachman (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186847">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186848" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243906878"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Mike, the fissures we see in these images are not necessarily to be correlated to the magnitude of the earthquakes - they are, in my view, a clear expression of extensional movement, or rifting. I say this because we have seen similar cracks on a number of occasions at Etna, when magma was pushing toward the surface (or travelling underneath the surface, which is not necessarily the same thing). These are the first images I come to see of the recent ongoings in Saudi Arabia, and they are impressive. The prolonged seismicity and this sort of ground fracturing look strikingly like an expression of magma movement - although there is no way to say whether the magma will ever reach the surface. Recent rifting episodes in Ethiopia and Iceland have shown that eruptions accompanying such rifting events deliver only a small portion of the magma involved to the surface, whereas most of the magma remains below the surface. Furthermore, rifting often comes in sequences of short episodes - such as in 1975-1985 in the Krafla system in Iceland, with no less than nine eruptive episodes.<br /> And yes, Halema'uma'u looks quite intense ...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186848&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="d943QrK0LhM624uGUnlF1UCvfxjDHjctIao3WWsTuAc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186848">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186849" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243907383"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm having a devil of a time finding pictures of these Saudi volcanos. Can anyone point me in a direction to find images?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186849&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="py2X_Qnk9TpIppwmU0sXfd9A7TrbYmTH8zIQYCc1gHo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">GregR (not verified)</span> on 01 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186849">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186850" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243932819"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Eris and Boris:<br /> any reason this type of event would be expected to show up more strongly on the horizontal components ( N ,E )of a seismogram (versus the Z component) ?</p> <p>thanks;<br /> Robert Somerville</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186850&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KFe6J9pteteOFz3Fs3ssIlJ39OYBgNRLPsEbNz-8PE0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 02 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186850">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186851" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243936157"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi gregR</p> <p>go through this page and you will find images for Harrat Alsakah(lunayyer).<br /><a href="http://www.mekshat.com/vb/showthread.php?t=206249">http://www.mekshat.com/vb/showthread.php?t=206249</a><br /> another thing .<br /> images are above and images in that page ,they have been taken by Doctor Khalid Alzaak.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186851&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jYsbTe13uZlMbgCcYSGwOoyOzjmDUGIshSPxyfHbdpk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Albalawi (not verified)</span> on 02 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186851">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186852" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243936274"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From:</p> <p><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/No-discrimination-in-evacuee-aid-Officials/">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/No-discrimination-in-evacuee-aid-Officials/</a></p> <p>â... According to Al-Aboudi, the latest statistics show that 1,812 families, consisting of 12,564 individuals, have been relocated in Madina, while 933 families of 6,127 individuals have gone to Yanbu and 139 families of 315 persons have been accommodated in Al-Aula.</p> <p>Meanwhile, security checkpoints at the entrances of Al-Eis region have intensified their procedures to prevent residents from entering as groups started to arrive Monday morning after rumors on the Internet stating authorities had allowed them to return.</p> <p>The Presidency of Meteorology and Environment said Monday in its daily statement that seismic activity at Harrat Al-Shaqa is declining and the strongest tremor was recorded at 2.8 degrees on the Richter scale. No volcanic vapors and no expansion of the ground cracks associated with the tremors, and the thermal measurements are normal, it said. - Okaz/SG - With reports from Khaled Al-Shalalhi and Ali Al-Harbiâ</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186852&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="lqXY4fQ-5SV_Otn2lppBrcZVQ__5EtSCS5C_aNgIG7A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 02 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186852">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186853" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243944255"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Point taken Boris about the fissures. Maybe I phrased it badly; if a tectonic quake had opened something that size it would be news. Makes me wonder if any ground deformation measurements have been taken? And echoing Robert's point to an extent; are there details of the type of quakes as well as just the magnitude? Anything like harmonic tremor for instance? The SGS conviction that 'magma movement' is involved makes me wonder.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186853&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hBib1iri2StpF_UKrLKFuQQsWSxQ4CaGHDjRTLlk2ig"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 02 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186853">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186854" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244199574"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Doctor Khalid Alzaak.</p> <p>Thank you for posting your photographs of the ground fractures caused by the recent earthquakes in Harrat Alsakah</p> <p>I believe that this picture in particular is very important.</p> <p><a href="http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b112cba315.jpg">http://www.burnews.com/infimages/myuppic/4a1b112cba315.jpg</a></p> <p>The surface trace of the foreground fracture climbs upslope to the right towards the skyline; however the ground surface on the skyline shows that the land to the left has been broken by the line of the fracture and that this ground is uplifted. This photograph is evidence of a thrust fault breaking the surface. As thrust faulting can be associated with magma emplacement forming a sill in the deep subsurface. I suggest that a map of the pattern of the ground fractures and their lateral extent will be very informative in establishing the extent of this possible sill.</p> <p>Kind Regards<br /> ÙÙÙÙب</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186854&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="jXbC2mJVYeLOKKmoF5TBse_y0VjkwxQw1Ujdk6KTGhE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Philip Mulholland (not verified)</span> on 05 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186854">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186855" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1244216976"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Philip: interesting comment on faulting/uplift on the fissure -check out the photo on Erik's latest post (Quick Update...etc) if you haven't already done so. Hard to tell for certain, but it looks very much from the pic as if the right-hand side of the fissure there has been visibly uplifted</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186855&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9pWbqZlu5RHfnu9AN9RJ4XdX4L889yacJnS3Ebn3d-o"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 05 Jun 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186855">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186856" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290793163"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Love your blog, will be stopping back again. Was hoping you also had a newsletter sign up, count me in.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186856&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="nhleh893y7rB2avtC1NfHn3NinZVpUDFkfZHDYrSWSk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://clearmyacne-now.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ismael Gracy (not verified)</a> on 26 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186856">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186857" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291144653"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Twitter had a tweet on <a href="http://starrettdialindicator.info/category/starrett-measuring-tools/"><b>Starrett Measuring Tools</b></a> that lead me hear for some reason. Not sure what this has to do with what I was looking for.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186857&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="AWiWxSPTGGIbqWK1pljTKJ56qi6T8snuH9kNigpPgco"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.discountcomputerwarehouse.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ellen Matsuno (not verified)</a> on 30 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186857">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186858" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291231364"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Twitter had a tweet on <a href="http://www.discountsportsmanstore.com/ammunition.html"><b>Discount Sportsman Store Ammunition</b></a> that lead me hear for some reason. Not sure what this has to do with what I was looking for.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186858&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yZeSVAzn4oWgHd1kwdqLuJTrnc0J8e4szzujrhRliO8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.huntingsupplieswarehouse.com/ammunition.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Luna Neiman (not verified)</a> on 01 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186858">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186859" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291553856"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Twitter had a tweet on <a href="http://www.beerbrewershop.com/concealment.html"><b>Beer Brewer Shop Concealment Products</b></a> that lead me hear for some reason. Not sure what this has to do with what I was looking for.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186859&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KOS6dS29JAGXWGMZeP3Xqm9q5RbuC3-46UALRjXmsYg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.riflescopewarehouse.com/cookware.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Shan Enz (not verified)</a> on 05 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186859">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186860" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292352165"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This blog has been loading slowly for me the last few days. I thought maybe it was my computer, but my sister visits your site as well and she told me the same thing is happening to her. Any ideas?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186860&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XZJE0hbGS0dSKvlwv07MknZIG2hqWOqC3L2O6SzW5zw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://pharmacytechonline.org/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">pharmacy tech online (not verified)</a> on 14 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186860">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186861" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292927668"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>See the button that says Submit? Donââ¬â¢t actually click that again. The Internet thanks you.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186861&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="wqQGjCu7JBjPWI343Dt1E9LuesJ1jJgu_zggeREkSkY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://app.moogo.com/app/www/cheaptextbooks.moogo.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">college textbooks (not verified)</a> on 21 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186861">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/06/01/earthquakes-continue-in-wester%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Mon, 01 Jun 2009 12:44:16 +0000 eklemetti 103977 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Wednesday Whatzits https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/27/wednesday-whatzits-1 <span>Wednesday Whatzits</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>You'll have to excuse the curtness of this post. An <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/2007-05-31-1264056931_x.htm">bad hop in softball</a> will do that to you.</p> <p>Here's some news:<br /><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_lzwsvkD7DLM/SbIC7zsUxLI/AAAAAAAABKI/a9CrA4rc4s4/s400/Mt%2BDempo2.jpg" /><br /><em>Mt. Dempo in Indonesia</em></p> <ul><li><em>Xinhua</em> offers <a href="http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-05/27/content_11444934.htm" target="_blank">some nice pictures of the current activity</a> going on at the summit crater at Nyiragongo in the Congo. Note the partially-crusted-over lava lake in the first shot. The Red Cross is updating the evacuation and mitigation plans for the area as the volcano shows increased activity.</li> <li>The alert level at <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0601-23=" target="_blank">Mt. Dempo</a> in Indonesia was raised to <a href="http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/27/alert-level-raised-mt-dempo.html" target="_blank">the second highest level</a>. There has been ash fall (as far as 10 km from the vent) and volcanic gas emissions. The volcano had experienced a phreatic explosion (water-magma explosions) in <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0601-23=&amp;volpage=weekly#Dec2008" target="_blank">early January</a>. The volcano also has a crater lake at the summit.</li> <li><a href="http://www.yellowstoneinsider.com/index.php?contentID=924&amp;articleID=283" target="_blank">Yellowstone put on a bit of a show</a> for participants of the <a href="http://www.earthscope.org/meetings/national_meeting_09" target="_blank">EarthScope meeting</a>. While visiting Biscuit Basin, they barely missed getting involved (in a bad way) in a <a href="http://www.mlive.com/newsflash/technology/index.ssf?/base/national-18/124318388065780.xml&amp;storylist=technology" target="_blank">10-second hydrothermal explosion</a> that threw boiling water and debris, but luckily caused no damage/injures. Hydrothermal explosions like these are <a href="http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/new.html#hydro" target="_blank">relatively common in the hydrothermal basins at Yellowstone</a>. </li><li>In the briefest of brief notes, there were <a href="http://www.larepublica.pe/sociedad/27/05/2009/breves" target="_blank">three explosions at Ubinas</a> (<em>in spanish</em>) in Peru yesterday. The explosions produced an kilometer-tall ash column, but no injuries were reported. Local authorities distributed masks to protect people from ash inhalation.</li> <li>There has been <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/earthquakes_subsiding_in_saudi.php#comment-1659852" target="_blank">a lot of chatter this morning</a> about more earthquakes in Saudi Arabia. From what I can gather, <a href="http://www.iris.edu/seismon/bigmap/index.phtml" target="_blank">the larger earthquake that occurred earlier today was well to the north (in southern Iran)</a> of the Harrat Lunayyir earthquake swarm and almost 100% unrelated.</li> <li><a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/friday_flotsam_3.php#comment-1654423" target="_blank">Some folks have also mentioned</a> that there has been <a href="http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/Maps/US2/35.37.-119.-117.php" target="_blank">an earthquake swarm</a> near the <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=120314-A" target="_blank">Long Valley Caldera</a> in California. I took a look and most of the activity is well south of the Caldera, and even the earthquakes closer to Long Valley look to be more associated with the faults on the west side of the valley rather than magmatism.</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Wed, 05/27/2009 - 06:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/congo-0" hreflang="en">Congo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/dempo" hreflang="en">Dempo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/explosive-eruption" hreflang="en">explosive eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/indonesia" hreflang="en">indonesia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/lava-lake" hreflang="en">lava lake</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/long-valley" hreflang="en">Long Valley</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/mitigation" hreflang="en">mitigation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/nyiragongo" hreflang="en">Nyiragongo</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/peru" hreflang="en">peru</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/ubinas" hreflang="en">Ubinas</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/united-states" hreflang="en">united states</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/yellowstone" hreflang="en">yellowstone</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186810" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243459523"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi Erik i found some info on MT.anak-krakatau it may be a tad old it dates back on may 17th but thats the olny update i can find for right now </p> <p><a href="http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/17/anak-krakatau-alert-surrounding-area-sealed.html">http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/17/anak-krakatau-alert-surro…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186810&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LzBCA6awEg65YycmjGWLCCjMVBKZ6wy4AsM_eiEpD2c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186810">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/05/27/wednesday-whatzits-1%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 27 May 2009 10:01:55 +0000 eklemetti 103971 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Earthquakes subsiding in Saudi Arabia https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/25/earthquakes-subsiding-in-saudi <span>Earthquakes subsiding in Saudi Arabia</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img src="http://filaty.com/i/903/4.965/IMG_2320.JPG" width="400" /><br /><em>Al-Qider volcano in western Saudi Arabia. Image courtesy of Ahmed Al-Hussaini.</em></p> <p>After a week's worth of worry, it appears that the <a href="http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090526/FOREIGN/705259851/1011/ART" target="_blank">seismicity in western Saudi Arabia is subsiding</a>. The latest statement from Zuhair Nawab, the head of the SGS, is that over the past four days with <a href="http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?col=&amp;section=middleeast&amp;xfile=data/middleeast/2009/May/middleeast_May448.xml" target="_blank">fewer and less severe aftershocks</a>. If this continues, people who have <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122825&amp;d=24&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009&amp;pix=kingdom.jpg&amp;category=Kingdom" target="_blank">evacuated the area around Al Ais</a> might be able to return to their homes in a few days. However, it is important to note that even though officials suggest the seismicity is waning (and there may be indications this is not entirely accurate), the swarm is definitely not "over".</p> <p>Rumors/reports of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/saudi_arabian_earthquake_updat.php" target="_blank">increased radon gas</a> and changes in the chemistry of the well waters near the earthquakes epicenters appear to be unfounded. Saad al Mohlafi, the deputy director of the National Observation Centre, said that "<em>no gases indicating an imminent eruption of a volcano have been found in Alees [Al-Ais].</em>" This contradicts a lot of what was being said earlier last week and would support the idea that these earthquakes might not be <em>directly</em> related to any imminent eruption from Harrat Lunayyir. However, this does not preclude the idea that these earthquake <u>could</u> have been the product of a subvolcanic intrusion of magma underneath the volcano field that did not lead to an eruption. These contradictory reports and rumors have <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122883&amp;d=26&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009&amp;pix=kingdom.jpg&amp;category=Kingdom" target="_blank">lead to more confusion</a> for the residents of the region.</p> <p>I am still flabbergasted by comments like this from Zuhair Nawab: "<em>The magma level is still at eight kilometres ... I don't know where the media got this worrying level from.</em>" I have yet to find any information about how the SGS (a) knows what depth there might be melt - i.e., magma and (b) what "magma level" even means. The <a href="http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090526/FOREIGN/705259851/1011/ART" target="_blank">article</a> linked here (and above) from <em>The National</em> in Abu Dhabi does suffer from a lot of mish-mashed science, such as bring up that, according to the EPA, radon <em>"is reportedly the second-most frequent cause of lung cancer, after cigarette smoking."</em> How does this help our understanding of any potential precursors to eruption? It really doesn't, but it does give an false pretense of scientific authority to the article.</p> <p>I'll keep an eye on how events might change in western Saudi Arabia - remember, just because seismicity seems to be waning now doesn't mean this won't change in the near future. In any case, these earthquakes were a fascinating study in how <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122516&amp;d=15&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009" target="_blank">rumor</a> can effect people's <a href="http://in.reuters.com/article/oilRpt/idINB10881720090523" target="_blank">perceptions of the perceived volcanic danger</a>. If another earthquake swarm were to begin in the next months or years, the reaction might be very different.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Mon, 05/25/2009 - 16:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/evacuations" hreflang="en">evacuations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-journalism" hreflang="en">Science Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-media" hreflang="en">volcanoes in the media</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186791" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243290478"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How does this connect with the seismic activity that recently happened in California, 4point something. All of the plates connect and sent shock waves through the earth's core and mantles apart from touching each other. Is there a planetary model that predicts and shows the stress points of the globe and where reverberating shocks might show up days weeks later across the globe?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186791&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="1mtLU8CjdxCToEhFgpjKpIHcbnHeDu4oczaYpZ73F4k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">megan (not verified)</span> on 25 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186791">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186792" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243302377"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Megan,</p> <p>I've seen a report of a study that a 7 earthquake can cause heightened seismic activity at the other side of the world for a few hours. But the strength of the earthquakes in Saudi Arabia weren't stronger than the typical earthquakes that occur each day. Five magnitude quakes occur on most days somewhere in the world. Some days it might be in the Andes, other days they occur in Indonesia or maybe Kamchatka. Sometimes they occur in Alaska or Europe, or the mid-Atlantic ocean. Volcanic earthquakes are not usually strong.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186792&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="qkSQl2-2WMzKz_XLu_88eltEiv5Az96WQr_fIlOjSRA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 25 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186792">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186793" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243398068"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Today's Seismic Monitor indicates a strong earthquake in Saudi Arabia Wed May 27 10:10:08 GMT 2009</p> <p><a href="http://www.iris.edu/seismon/bigmap/index.phtml">http://www.iris.edu/seismon/bigmap/index.phtml</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186793&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OXp60x6zMXRd0uIm-92c6sU-maT65Yrpyf1tPOXD3G8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Perry Debell (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186793">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186794" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243399333"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>thats weird, neither Iris or<br /> "European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre";<br /><a href="http://www.emsc-csem.org/index.php?page=home">http://www.emsc-csem.org/index.php?page=home</a> ,<br /> show any now 10:40 May 27( UTC )</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186794&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="QpZH15jVXT4YBsba6-gxdukstlJIWKSBooGnx5RFAYg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186794">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186795" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243416483"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I see nothing on the USGS web site. There was an earthquake in Iran today. Are you confusing this with Saudi Arabia?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186795&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Lvn3CPehvJg7vmeU66663lHU-tFKA1rj3ds0c2oyj40"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186795">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186796" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243466458"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>My apologies. You guys are right and I am so wrong. I did not apply map reading skills and jumped on the flashing red circle in Iran. Be thankful I am not an airline pilot, otherwise we would now be propaganda I am so mortified that I could not distinguish between the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf.</p> <p>Today, it's the eastern Pacific Rim that is active.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186796&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="4DFVjV6IhEDINbjKxafj5iJ0P31j7nx7HKpJaqDoDdk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Perry Debell (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186796">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186797" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243485697"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>apparently not the first time this area has scared the Saudis:<br /><a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=102500&amp;d=16&amp;m=10&amp;y=2007">http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=102500&amp;d=16&amp;m=10&amp;y=20…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186797&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hY3vaORH3m1lMZ0vL8346IpjSdyDeI8L20O9tCZMUic"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 28 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186797">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186798" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243501869"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Is this connected as to deeper earth magma and plate movements and shockwaves bouncing?</p> <p>[[ 7.1 earthquake topples homes in Honduras, Belize (AP)<br /> AP - A strong earthquake killed at least one man early Thursday as it collapsed homes in Honduras and Belize and sent people running into the streets in their pajamas as far away as Guatemala City. ]]</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186798&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WZ-gFdnDcWQF-nN7UYd67pJ_VwpwfpRAKDhugyvnvo8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">megan (not verified)</span> on 28 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186798">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186799" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243591075"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Return-of-tremor-evacuees-postponed/">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Return-of-tremor-evacuees-postponed/</a></p> <p>Article states, âAL-EIS - Civil Defense officials have postponed the return of evacuees to their homes in Al-Eis and the villages of Omluj until next week after light tremors were felt in the region on Wednesday. Tremors occurred early Wednesday afternoon, with the strongest two recorded at 2.6 and 2.2 on the Richter scale, shortly after the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) had published its daily report saying that no tremors of over three on the Richter scale had been registered in the previous 24 hours. A Civil Defense official said Wednesday that the return of evacuees would now not take place until after Saturday. - Okaz/SGâ</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186799&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BO0w1JVhussW8nnM7Y7_byMAaR97a2lOZ8tNXfhgkIQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 29 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186799">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186800" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243602841"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>&gt; How does this connect ...?<br /> &gt; Is this connected ...?</p> <p>Short answer: through the planet, yes, slightly.</p> <p>Megan, you probably can get a pointer from one of the scientists about research on connection between quakes far apart. There have been some papers published recently showing slightly more small quakes than expected, even at large distances, during a short time after some large quakes. </p> <p>That's a small signal emerging from a high background noise level -- detected in the past few years. Like much else in science, correlation and statistical work were needed to show there is something there. Details? Maybe someone who knows something about it will give you a pointer.</p> <p>Try the experiment at home. On the largest table in the house, make a lot of little piles of salt or sand by pouring it out of a small funnel or paper cone, so you have a whole lot of little conical piles. Each will be at the angle of repose for the material.</p> <p>Kick one leg of the table. How many of them collapse?</p> <p>Elaborate this -- make a grid on the table, or use a sewing table cover (preprinted, like graph paper but table size, for those who don't know).</p> <p>Put one of the little cones of material in each square. Kick the table leg. Is there a pattern to which ones collapse?</p> <p>Elaborate again -- take some pepper, some salt, and some cumin or other spice. Make up three combinations of varying proportions. Throw a die to decide which of your three mixes goes in each square randomly. Kick the table leg.</p> <p>My guess -- the other table legs will either transfer more of the shaking or stabilize the piles over them. The varying mixes will have different angles of repose.</p> <p>Dampen some of the material before making cones; does that make them more or less likely to collapse?</p> <p>Lots of variables, far more than this suggests. Yes, one very large remote quake may slightly increase, for a brief period of time, the chance of something nearby, but there's much more going on. </p> <p>We know there will be another earthquake. The rest is probabilities.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186800&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="u0eoBGsvE7gAEbimXcuWok7iaed4aEELBmZFLmr5Gn8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hank Roberts (not verified)</span> on 29 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186800">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186801" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243811726"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>earthquakes this weekend:<br /><a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=123108&amp;d=1&amp;m=6&amp;y=2009">http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=123108&amp;d=1&amp;m=6&amp;y=2009</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186801&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="o8IKTZBRCtGw9VIT4zaKbKSZMA9ht1vSZYlkwoJnGPI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 31 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186801">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> Mon, 25 May 2009 20:02:08 +0000 eklemetti 103969 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Friday Flotsam https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/22/friday-flotsam-3 <span>Friday Flotsam</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><form mt:asset-id="13685" class="mt-enclosure mt-enclosure-image" style="display: inline;"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-2d459c62741f8947b3c44d292c42f2d1-Pohutu.jpg" alt="i-2d459c62741f8947b3c44d292c42f2d1-Pohutu.jpg" /></form> <p><em>Pohutu Geyser in Rotorua, New Zealand. Image taken by Erik Klemetti in January 2009.</em></p> <p>It has been busy busy week for me, capped off today with a talk about my field work in New Zealand (see above), so I don't have much to say. Not much new news today about the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/harrat_lunayyir_and_the_saudi.php">Saudi Arabian earthquake swarms</a>, but again, I'll keep my eyes pealed (incidentally, I still haven't been able to figure out why no western news sources have even mentioned the swarm).</p> <p>Anyway, here's are some volcanic tidbits to enjoy over the long weekend:</p> <ul><li>Vog, as seen from space. Volcanic fog, fashionably shortened to "vog" is a real hazard in Hawai'i, <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/03/how_volcanoes_affect_the_econo.php">damaging crops and lungs</a>. The current shuttle mission (to repair Hubble), landing tomorrow, took some great images of Hawai'i, showing not only the <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=38709">vog on the island</a>, but also the <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=38734">ocean entry of lavas from Kilauea</a>.</li> <li>In the bevy of <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/29th_anniversary_of_the_mount.php">Mt. Saint Helens anniversary</a> articles this week, there were a couple that mentioned the new monitoring equipment being installed on the volcano. They are relatively inexpensive <a href="http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/story/746585.html">GPS units called "spiders"</a>. They do have a bit of Skynet in them as the spiders will have "<em>computer-programmed "brains" can decide what some data means and which information is most important</em>". However, they do seem to be about as state-of-the-art of any volcano monitoring I've ever seen. <em>{Hat tip to Eruptions reader Richard Gardner for this news.}</em></li> <li>The <a href="http://www.ktuu.com/Global/story.asp?S=10392867">economic impact of the current activity at Redoubt</a> is beginning to be felt in Alaska. The state figures it might be losing $1.5 million per month for the shutdown of Cook Inlet production due to the threat to the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/04/oil_from_the_drift_river_termi.php">Drift River Oil Terminal</a>. Meanwhile, AVO continues <a href="http://www.peninsulaclarion.com/stories/051909/new_294210370.shtml">to wait for the big dome collapse</a> that is likely to occur at the Alaskan volcano.</li> </ul></div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Fri, 05/22/2009 - 08:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/alaska" hreflang="en">Alaska</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/cascades" hreflang="en">cascades</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/hawaii-0" hreflang="en">Hawai&#039;i</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/kilauea" hreflang="en">Kilauea</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/new-zealand" hreflang="en">New Zealand</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/redoubt" hreflang="en">Redoubt</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saint-helens" hreflang="en">Saint Helens</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/united-states" hreflang="en">united states</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/vog" hreflang="en">Vog</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-hazards-program" hreflang="en">Volcano Hazards Program</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/st-helens" hreflang="en">St. Helens</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/remote-sensing" hreflang="en">remote sensing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-hazards" hreflang="en">volcanic hazards</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanoes-and-economy" hreflang="en">volcanoes and the economy</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186781" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243001965"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Not quite right that no Western media have picked up on the quakes; there's this from CNN:<br /><a href="http://cnnwire.blogs.cnn.com/2009/05/19/hundreds-evacuated-after-saudi-arabia-earthquakes/">http://cnnwire.blogs.cnn.com/2009/05/19/hundreds-evacuated-after-saudi-…</a></p> <p>Mind you, just eight lines of copy, hardly headline news.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186781&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vHVG4ajTKEmnQLvUD5mJY09JCIer1Nj4F687g0O8Krs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186781">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186782" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243119161"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>hi Erik i found some info on Saudi Arabia</p> <p>there not march info there but i give you a link and you can look it overe</p> <p>malaysia.news.yahoo.com/rtrs/20090523/tbs-saudi-refineries-955c2a1.html</p> <p>all so Erik do you ues yahoo IM???</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186782&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="C5e0E0mqp-CPDrJZuANPbfqTPYju0iQe7Sanr9MzYfI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David (not verified)</span> on 23 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186782">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186783" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243164622"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>i think Long Valley has some in too do with all the quakes we been haveing down there in S CA</p> <p>entral California Hit With 4.7 Magnitude Earthquake</p> <p>KEELER, Calif. â A moderate earthquake has jolted an inland desert area in Central California.</p> <p>The U.S. Geological survey says the 4.7-magnitude quake struck just before 4 p.m. on Saturday.</p> <p>A preliminary report shows the quake was centered about seven miles southeast of Keeler, a small town in unincorporated Inyo County next to Owens Lake.</p> <p>Several calls to the Inyo County Sheriffâs Department went unanswered.</p> <p>it sould be noted that LA CA has been hit with a 4.7 follow by a 4.1 too days later the 4.7 was on sunday of last weekedend and the 4.1 was on tunday of last week and now here we are with yet other 4.7 on sat all in the same week</p> <p># Inyo Says:<br /> May 23rd, 2009 at 10:47 pm</p> <p>yeah, all these quakes are probably leading up to something. Long Valley has been active too, perhaps Mammoth will erupt</p> <p>Erik do you think you can look in too this and find out whats going on???</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186783&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Fg4D5j1rhTee5m_XM4UtFxLslXThqOJPOJW2yTElfU0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David (not verified)</span> on 24 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186783">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186784" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243169932"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>IF the quakes are of volcanic origin -and it's a big if, tectonic quakes are hardly unknown in CA- the Inyo/Mono volcanic system, last confirmed activity &lt;800 years ago, seems a more likely culprit than Long Valley itself. Be good to know the depth of the quakes as well as the epicenters, which is all that news reports usually give you</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186784&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="rGEML2m7GDheHKWK4rfF0c2bfqwnhJTLPHgm6jInzko"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 24 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186784">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186785" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243170126"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(message was cut off??) about to continue: ,800 years ago, would seem a more likely source than Long Valley. Be good to know the depth of the quakes rather than/as well as the epicenters</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186785&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="77Puxx_uh5TtyzcVlkIqmUr2UK_rvOmUjETyiOTyZGg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 24 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186785">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186786" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243183237"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Looks as if the bigger earthquake depth was about .1 miles</p> <p><a href="http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/Quakes/ci14462064.php">http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/Quakes/ci14462064.php</a></p> <p>These earthquakes are south of Owens Lake. I am not sure if that area is inside Long Valley.</p> <p>though...</p> <p>A couple of weeks ago authorites closed a popular hot springs hang-out near Mamoth. The water temps shot up very high.</p> <p><a href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3045/">http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3045/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186786&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="LGHon91b6TIoywRLTAwrQV0hQCzwrnQjVusOCN_DaMM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">theroachman (not verified)</span> on 24 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186786">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186787" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243410824"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The shaking continues in or around Long Valley. Up to about 60 quakes over the past week.</p> <p><a href="http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/Maps/US2/35.37.-118.-116.php">http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/Maps/US2/35.37.-118.-11…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186787&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="x5BhgC61GNcmhzNuzXj3-0WMMQ3p7bFUw4N5DW4wQu0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">theroachman (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186787">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186788" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243424456"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>most of these earthquakes are near the Coso Volcanic field, south of Long Valley</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186788&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="KwqmEFCI31qHTdpYYkV8yUy5KpYyDoerA7bd217Xag0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186788">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186789" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243427089"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The earthquakes are a little closer to Coso than Long Valley, but still a long way from either - 25 miles / 35 km from Coso and 100 miles / 185 km from Long Valley. I talk a little about it in <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/wednesday_whatzits_1.php">today's roundup.</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186789&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="K9z9oRYd5aLE_WBKLpH035QnTMIutexhui6YuA1cXNk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 27 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186789">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186790" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1291858736"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I love the way you sound so passionate about what you are writing. Keep up the great work!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186790&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ytRPJovtPgiT0C4U0SP7E6jTVM6vI6IfEwd3Bi845xw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://rankingdomination.net/faq.html" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="google website ranking">google website… (not verified)</a> on 08 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186790">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/05/22/friday-flotsam-3%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Fri, 22 May 2009 12:17:32 +0000 eklemetti 103968 at https://www.scienceblogs.com More signs point towards a Saudi Arabian eruption ... or not? UPDATED https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/21/more-signs-point-towards-a-sau <span>More signs point towards a Saudi Arabian eruption ... or not? UPDATED</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><form mt:asset-id="13595" class="mt-enclosure mt-enclosure-image" style="display: inline;"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-9affb77454b06d4ae992745ee820446c-ISS009-E-11608_eruptions_sm.jpg" alt="i-9affb77454b06d4ae992745ee820446c-ISS009-E-11608_eruptions_sm.jpg" /></form> <p><em><strong><br /> UPDATE 5/21/2009 4:30 PM Pacific</strong></em>: The <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122773&amp;d=22&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009&amp;pix=kingdom.jpg&amp;category=Kingdom" target="_blank">latest news</a> suggests that there are little to no evidence of volcanic gases since Wednesday according to the SGS, but they continue to monitor.</p> <p><em>Lava flows from a 1256 A.D. eruption near Medinah in Saudi Arabia (to the south of Harrat Lunayyir) taken by the crew of the ISS in 2004. It shows nicely the volcanic heritage (dark lava flow on right of image) in western Saudi Arabia. Image courtesy of JSC Earth Observation Lab.</em></p> <p>Well, as the days go by, there are <a href="http://business.maktoob.com/20090000003703/Saudi_volcanic_eruption_imminent_/Article.htm" target="_blank">more and more indications that an eruption</a> is about to occur in the Harrat Lunayyir region of Saudi Arabia. There is more confirmation in the press about "hot gasses" being released in the area near the epicenter(s) of the earthquakes and the seismicity is continuing - boths signs of magma moving towards the surface and degassing as it does. There are <a href="http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v5/newsindex.php?id=412677" target="_blank">other confusing reports</a> that mention things like "increased Radon" - which (a) I'm not entirely sure how they are measuring; (b) I'm not sure what it has to do with basaltic magmatism and (c) I think people are confusing with <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/stressrelated/2009/04/earthquake_prediction_and_the.php" target="_blank">the controversy surrounding the Italian earthquake</a>. <a href="http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1&amp;section=0&amp;article=122745&amp;d=21&amp;m=5&amp;y=2009" target="_blank">Now over 2,000 people have been evacuated</a> from the region near the earthquakes - and many of the quakes are still being felt far afield from the Al-Ais (Harrat Lunayyir) area.</p> <p>If you find more news on the earthquakes and other signs of an impending eruption, please post them here!</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Thu, 05/21/2009 - 05:39</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/basaltic-eruption" hreflang="en">basaltic eruption</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/evacuations" hreflang="en">evacuations</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/science-journalism" hreflang="en">Science Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/speculation" hreflang="en">speculation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcanic-gases" hreflang="en">volcanic gases</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186748" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242900427"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>a quick Google of radon &amp; magma indicates some geoscientists are trying to monitor radon released from the magma chamber near vent systems, ie Mt. Etna ... with varying degrees of success ....</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186748&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="oEOs0ua74MGZGiXUhzUrAIAxfl5sEGwXTDVOJscJyI4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186748">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186749" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242901393"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In fact, as robert indicated we (that is my colleagues Marco Neri and Salvo Giammanco, me and a few others) do measure radon at Etna, continuously since 4 years, with a test phase in 1998 lasting a few weeks. What we have seen on a number of occasions is that eruptive events (such as lava fountains at Etna's summit - where, however, the conduits are always open, which is different from the current situation in Saudi Arabia) were preceded by hours to &gt;1 day by significant increases in radon activity, which is what we measure in becquerel per second per cubic meter. We have not seen any whatsoever correlation of changes in radon activity with earthquakes, and it is highly doubtful that radon measurements can make us "predict" earthquakes. This is because earthquakes generally are the result of fault displacements at many kilometers of depth, whereas radon is released only from the uppermost few meters below the Earth's surface (not from magma chambers, though!). But, if ground fracturing occurs at the surface, we can see changes in radon activity, and fracturing might actually be occurring in the seismically active region in Saudi Arabia. So the observation of changes in radon activity there is not surprising at all for me, and it would be interesting to learn more about the studies done there in this moment.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186749&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="sKgC_apL_NYKHv4CHzgs0pTNkOuA93FP4ol2_PtaV8M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186749">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186750" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242905061"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thanks Robert and Boris for the extended info on radon monitoring - it shows that I don't know what I am talking about some of the time! Nothing wrong with not knowing - that is part of the reason I started this blog, to learn from all of you.</p> <p>Anyway, I think my point in singling out the abundance of radon news goes along with what Boris pointed out - there isn't really any good correlation. I mean, what is wrong with looking at carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide? We know that it correlates with magmatic activity, so why are we so concerned with radon. It would be great if radon could become the "holy grail" of predictive monitoring - and I would be thrilled to hear about any data the SGS has collected on the subject, but I think in this situation, it is muddying the waters.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186750&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="vngUVrZ645xWCAdeaU-s9HSRKFa_WuoIGkDrEnflL4U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186750">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186751" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242906442"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi everyone</p> <p>I knew from the beggining that this activity is related to magma movements</p> <p>Tectonic movements doesn't dissappear and change like what is happening in the area now</p> <p>The activity started on the 4th of May 2009 by small and deep tremors</p> <p>The first tremor that could be felt was M3.7</p> <p>more than 1200 tremors occured in less than 48 hours</p> <p>All of them occured deep in earth about 40 kilometers depth</p> <p>Then it started to rise to 30 kilometers and as we see now it's less than 10 kilometers</p> <p>Anyone need more information I will be pleased to provide what I know</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186751&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="tSQmb9-rTT-hyIA8Ofm-Z5mylDMf_cPjiI9iKyYEmJ8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ahmed (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186751">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186752" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242907647"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ahmed;<br /> do you have access to a list of earthquakes (on the web?) Are the earthquakes still happening now ???</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186752&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="N3DV7s53sqLMuFVnfYnNlPA0f3Wl7VQjprQXdAT--U4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186752">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186753" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242908588"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Unfortunately I don't have access to it</p> <p>quakes are still happening but nothing is serious since the M5.6 tremor</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186753&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yHq0GEoymoJ_XyZIPYxgMZ8ImRpL3rHR-fiOvW7Arno"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ahmed (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186753">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186754" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242909122"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I forgot to mention that this activity occured about 3 years ago, 2006 or 2007 I can't define the date a tremor occured and was less than M4 then nothing happened even minor tremors but the activity started again and that what makes me think it's magma movements not a tectonic related tremors</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186754&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RGjP6eaxYqfb1ivCXfUYujA5Hq1j_MvwMvdNOjA1ONY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ahmed (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186754">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186755" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242910970"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/neic_gvbs_h.html">This link</a> provides a seismic history of that area since 1990.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186755&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BUkckbXqtJGjigWepccrpMKSUT63Ubix0H-d9u0zDLs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">George (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186755">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186756" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242922415"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>will this affect oil prices?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186756&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3LuJc9-XSCKkZrStS_3bC2LFZ12W5_1N48Z1uzonaLM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">nidh (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186756">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186757" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242923492"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Riyadh, May 21, SPA -- The Saudi Geological Survey Commission, Saudi Arabia's authority in charge of monitoring and controlling seismological activity in the country, said today that the volcanic activity at Harrat Al-Shaqa, which showed unprecedented activity over the last 30 days, registered recent remarkable fall in terms of number and strength.<br /> In a press statement, the authority said only six minor quakes were registered during the last 24 hours measuring about 3 points on the Richter scale.<br /> The statement said nobody felt or reported the shocks neither of which exposed in volcanic vapor.<br /> --SPA</p> <p><a href="http://www.spa.gov.sa/english/readsinglenews.php?id=666755&amp;scroll=1">http://www.spa.gov.sa/english/readsinglenews.php?id=666755&amp;scroll=1</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186757&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="3Qczvc-fWBSQRWnmQHDI3cJFUnBCKlKSNXbvsNR5YTI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186757">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186758" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242928408"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Are there any geobloggers on the Arabian Peninsula? If not, there's a niche for someone "on the scene"...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186758&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Oxxple2GqOVEwMfivt8Lb1qqJwIQt160Gbea45x1M08"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/geoblog" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Callan Bentley (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186758">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186759" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242928478"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi Erik,</p> <p>Boris Behncke was saying that he did find a correlation with âsignificant increases in radon activityâ preceding âby hours to &gt;1 dayâ âeruptive eventsâ âon a number of occasionsâ.</p> <p>But he did write in the same paragraph âWe have not seen any whatsoever correlation of changes in radon activity with earthquakesâ. </p> <p>Two different subjects. I believe Boris was saying he did observe a radon correlation with impending eruptions but not with earthquakes. You probably remember that someone âpredictedâ a recent earthquake in Italy based on elevated Radon levels. That was probably still on the mind of Boris and because he switched topics of discussion - and you probably read his post quickly your sharp mind missed his point. (I miss these type of points too sometimes.) :)</p> <p>However, now that some of the pent up pressure from the volcano was released - the difficult job of vulcanologists begins.</p> <p>Is the volcano just waiting another burp of pressure from inside in the earth and then it will erupt? Is there a blockage in a magma tube somewhere that is especially tough and maybe the magma chamber is quietly and inexorably pressurizing? </p> <p>Maybe all the new magma rose as far as it is going to go and it will have to wait for another infusion of magma and so we may wait years to erupt?</p> <p>There are a lot of âwhat if'sâ. </p> <p>Without a significant investment in volcano research these type of questions will remain with us for a long time.</p> <p>Now it may not be worth spending billions and billions just to get a handle on these size eruptions. But there are many caldera systems that can shock the whole world - if they erupt. The next time we get a few eruptions like we had in the 1800's from Tambora and Krakatau it will strain the world food reserves and cause famine. </p> <p>Also, I am not sure how a worldwide ash cloud will affect jet airlines. Now, you need a substantial ash cloud to stop cold a jets engines. But what if a plane has to fly daily in a very diffuse ash cloud that is worldwide? Will the engines wear very quickly?</p> <p>Just a Thursday rant from a volcano enthusiast. (I can't come up with a cute word to go with Thursday.)</p> <p>Keep up the great work Erik.! :)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186759&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="veJvgAT2GYEfVFOsGd_sOgY1wYR4ul6oM_IkewEX3W0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186759">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186760" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242930491"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If this event turns into a volcano of the type anticipated (shield), then there should not be any effect on the oil markets. If it becomes something else, though, then it's possible that Red Sea shipping might be affected. I've seen some 'environmental' blogs suggesting that this activity is due to the removal of petroleum from underground (i.e., 'pumping oil'), but given the distance between the oil fields in the Eastern Province and Madinah Province, I think this highly unlikely.</p> <p>Large ash clouds, however, could have a deleterious effect on US military flights. Right now, the US military readily obtains overflight rights from the Saudis. These flights are critical to mission support in both Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as a lot of Central and South Asia. </p> <p>If Saudi airspace were closed due to ash clouds, things are going to get tricky for the Pentagon (and other agencies) currently crossing the KSA.</p> <p>I've met a few people from the Saudi Geological Survey in the past and they were all extremely competent. They, though, are facing an unprecedented (for them) challenge. I'm sure they won't hesitate to ask for whatever assistance they might need from their counterparts in Europe or the US, but the possibility of turf wars is sadly real.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186760&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ePqADEL3PEbQpFfFzUbWUunM3aD4ZvD1VvaZZ3m4YGI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.xrdarabia.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John Burgess (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186760">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186761" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242933721"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Thomas -- I guess what I was refering to was Boris comment about how the setting for detecting radon was different: Etna is an open vent while any potential magma in Harrat Lunayyir could be kilometers below the surface. It is interesting to see this correlation, but again (and Boris would hopefully agree), carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide emissions are still a more robust indicator of magma and eruptions.</p> <p>John - I'm guessing that any eruption from the Harrat Lunayyir lava field will not produce significant amounts of particulate ash considering it should be basalt or basanite - low viscosity magma. However, what might be significant is the amount of carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide/hydrogen sulfide released. Remember, the Laki eruption in Iceland in 1789 was a basaltic fissure that released huge amounts of these volcanic aerosols.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186761&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="fPllQFe6blBQYVCqUoxkx-pNusRptM2M6sW4LObzu58"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186761">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186762" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242940031"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yes, Erik. I didn't fully comprehend all the nuances of Boris Behnke's comment. I might not fully understand it still - but that is OK. What will happen in Saudi Arabia will happen. </p> <p>Now, if those gases that you suggest could be emitted are released in large quantities, people will have to project how much (if any) these gases will affect the climate. </p> <p>I am getting frustrated with how little people actually know about climate science. All these variables. Sun spots and lack of sun spots. A weakening magnetic field, cosmic rays - volcanic activity, the forcing factor of CO2 and how powerful it is. </p> <p>Volcanoes have traditionally played a part in climate change. Some of the climate money being doled out should also include the volcanology angle. (But that is just my opinion.)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186762&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="STWo5PeyeFwsQvMpeGr4RVhqOYDVK5Fn9cYsRIZpHqo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186762">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186763" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242946028"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Certainly measuring carbon dioxide (and possibly sulfur dioxide) would be very useful and interesting in this case in Saudi Arabia. Carbon dioxide is released from magma already when it's many kilometers below the surface, whereas sulfur dioxide comes later, when the magma gets closer (say, around 3 to 5 km) to the surface. But this is well known for an open-conduit volcano like Etna, whereas in Saudi Arabia a new conduit would have to form for a new eruption, so things might be very different there. This is what makes this case so interesting: to my knowledge, the most recent case of a new eruption in a cinder cone field is that of Paricutin in 1943, and no monitoring was done there before the eruption.<br /> I would not, in any case, expect a new eruption in Saudi Arabia to be of cataclysmic proportions. It would be a Hawaiian-style basaltic eruption with a cluster of cinder cones growing at the vents, very minor and dilute eruption columns without much of a chance of affecting even the local climate, and extensive flows of fluid lava, lasting a few weeks to maybe a few months. The eruption at Jabal-al-Tair (Yemen) a few years ago was a fine example of the type of eruption to be expected in the area.<br /> Thanks to all of you who provide updates and insights into this evolving situation.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186763&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XoptGvc7IbQSL5WKHHRwOJQDV8dvqU-k8IF1om-V_Mc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186763">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186764" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242955024"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Boris,<br /> What about Heimaey, Iceland in 1973? Although I suspect that no readings exist for this either.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186764&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="J4_MGEB1yRvuxjPsgskbsPnEt53u8FSdlNjxylXoUQk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Richard Oliver (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186764">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186765" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242957127"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>so why are we so concerned with radon</em></p> <p>Pragmatism, I suppose. Radon is easy to detect, because it is the only radioactive gas you are likely to find. Besides, the molecule has only one atom, which means it can penetrate porous rocks easily.</p> <p>Unfortunately radon is itself produced by radioactive decay, and the lodes of uranium may not be where you need them...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186765&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2A422Ho7MxJBtCg4SJmKgzVbt4C371S-RxWcf_HDiFc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Lassi Hippeläinen (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186765">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186766" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242963674"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I guess it remains to be seen whether this all leads to an eruption, Eric, but it shouldn't be too surprising if it does. Apart from all the pretty cones all over the area that you can see on Google Earth/Maps, I gather that "harrat" basically means a lava field.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186766&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BNy6F63xYBFr81IScWMceA8YezRrKoosaEL5wb4OnFw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Pykie (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186766">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186767" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242968647"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"Now over 2,000 people have been evacuated"</p> <p>the correct is:<br /> Now over 20,000 people have been evacuated.<br /> from alays , and umm luj.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186767&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="7cyUvr-wUv1uNyqffpslSAlnXfR40COUOQwLR878H8E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">report (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186767">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186768" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242969234"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>HI, about the Radon issue, we are monitoring Radon activity at the Canary Islands, as we think is a good indicator of seismic activity.</p> <p>About CO2, we don´t need an open conduit to perform CO2 degassing, as most of CO2 is released in a diffuse mode (non visible). Diffuse degassing studies have been performed by many groups, ITER among them, all around the world. I agree with Boris about CO2 and SO2, but for sure SO2 will be difficult to find prior to the eruption if we don´t have an open crater...</p> <p>I will suggest, if possible, to track any water spring around that zone. Maybe they can follow dissolved gasses trapped in water....</p> <p>Anyway, is a really interesting situation....</p> <p>Best Regards and congratulations for the comments in here.<br /> David</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186768&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="0OAi4DiUWKqYFOMKY5J5a7vdUplP8DvjB0eBBenITHs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">David Calvo (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186768">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186769" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242988832"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I found an online seismograph from Ar Riyad using GEE (Global Earthquake explorer), but without another live station close to Yanbu , hard to say where the apparent tremors are coming from that the Ar Riyad station is recording ( ... maybe 4 today ?? .... )</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186769&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Y6rEJadkL_cnrRee7PgRfUyA9DjGrVbs_XSrwZgbTV0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186769">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186770" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242989099"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This discussion has reminded me that I don't know nearly enough about volcanic gas monitoring - both as gas measurements or measurements in water samples. Sounds like I need to do some research and maybe post on Rn in volcanic systems sometime when I get a moment. Testing the springs in the area would be an excellent idea as well to look for the input of magmatic volatiles into the upper parts of the crust - that is what was done around South Sister in Oregon when the infamous "bulge" was discovered on INSAR imaging.</p> <p>Speaking of which, I imagine there isn't any deformation information for this area of Saudi Arabia? That would also be interesting to examine.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186770&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9NzUz0ZLEdblBxeH4dqzyqimemKQZASoL1-wtjYGzpE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186770">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186771" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242992688"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I'm unaware of any deformation monitoring being done in the Kingdom at present. There wasn't any as of a few years ago, when I was last there. Perhaps there is now, but I can find nothing published on it.</p> <p>Springs? Saudi Arabia, the Desert Kingdom? Well, the Harrat isn't quite as dry as the Empty Quarter, so maybe...</p> <p>More practical might be wells at depths of 100+ meters.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186771&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="MUEfTZAL1EhDQ3Rp5VwhYpTWg_1VGy3vCAPuBmJYFr4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.xrdarabia.org" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John Burgess (not verified)</a> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186771">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186772" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242998563"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>David's comment from the Canaries has in fact underlined an important fact, that CO2 can be monitored without an open conduit, and in fact we don't measure it at Etna's active summit craters but on its flanks and at its base. Studying the geochemistry of waters issuing in volcanic areas can be very helpful - indeed, at the Three Sisters in Oregon a few years ago, where uplift was detected first thanks to radar interferometry (InSAR, a satellite-based radar technique aiming at detecting ground deformation), significant changes in water geochemistry was observed once the uplift had been revealed. I think that radar interferometry might be useful for the area affected by the recent seismicity and possible degassing in Saudi Arabia. If magma is rising toward the surface in a place where no open volcanic conduit is existing, that should cause some quite intense ground deformation, most probably uplift. We see Etna (an open-conduit volcano!) uplift each time before it erupts, and similar observations are now known from a number of other volcanoes, including Sierra Negra in the Galapagos (prior to its 2005 eruption) and Okmok, which erupted explosively last year. I doubt there has been any classical volcano monitoring in the Kingdom until now, because active volcanism hasn't been much of a factor in everyday life for a few generations there, so satellite based data might be the single thing to rely on for the moment.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186772&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ruxDCi4xyet1fQbbjDxsW33KRPGqvbBGD9pwS0CgGQg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186772">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186773" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243004816"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In Saudi Arabia ..... volcano arduous mobile now, "is not the only Sroat over the mountain from the north of the peninsula to the south Is it possible to move after a volcanic eruption Hrpahagah move now," Saudi Arabia, even if some of them extend for some hundreds of kilometers and the other Alkleomtrut What scientific outlook, which can be relied upon, or previous experience of such a situation.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186773&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="CIWYNkBqzPtnSswhYLZAs_iT3uBBqQBsqsOxaO-zPQU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186773">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186774" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243004994"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In Saudi Arabia ..... volcano arduous mobile now, "is not the only Sroat over the mountain from the north of the peninsula to the south Is it possible to move after a volcanic eruption Hrpahagah move now," Saudi Arabia, even if some of them extend for some hundreds of kilometers and the other Alkleomtrut What scientific outlook, which can be relied upon, or previous experience of such a situation.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186774&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6YgjCWdretsQ93uwfZ8NA1QTuG3XnOdS0LVy3etsaU8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">m (not verified)</span> on 22 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186774">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186775" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243068813"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>FROM:<br /><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Seismic-activities-subside/">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Seismic-activities-subside/</a></p> <p>âAL-AIS: Although three more tremors measuring 3.62 on the Richter scale shook Al-Ais 240 km northwest of Madinah on Friday, Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) said seismic activities at Harrah Al-Shaqah, the epicenter of the earthquake and the location of extinct volcanoes, subsided considerably. ...The tremors were registered between 2 p.m. on Thursday and 2 p.m. yesterday, said Col. Zuhair Sabeeh, commander of the Civil Defense force in Al-Ais.<br /> .... Sabeeh said the Civil Defense has worked out a plan to bring back residents to their homes once the situation returns to normal.</p> <p>The situation has now improved considerably and all indicators show that the tremors will end within the next few days, he said.<br /> ...â</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186775&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zdmX2ZezI7UV5beVJYuWQwPkkyw1rk6Pvoo0p1CV-TY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thomas Donlon (not verified)</span> on 23 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186775">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186776" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1243078049"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>To answer Richard's question (comment #17) about gas monitoring at Heimaey before the 1973 eruption: no, there was no whatsoever kind of volcano monitoring at all - Heimaey was considered volcanically extinct! There was not even a seismic station on the island; a large seismic swarm probably related to magma movement immediately before the eruption was recorded by more distant seismographs, without, however, raising any suspicions.<br /> Here's a good description of the Heimaey 1973 eruption:<br /><a href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/heimaey/">http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/heimaey/</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186776&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="9GiTxLj9v3V1886FALQHAf-Wfl-48VHxZGIOZWLkJwE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.ct.ingv.it" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Boris Behncke (not verified)</a> on 23 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186776">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186777" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290260703"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"the greatest thing about Facebook, is that you can quote something and totally make up the source.â â George Washington</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186777&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Yqc8EV7tKSdkCghMPc0pszjY5Dp_P-knl880s4AA1sA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://bit.ly/9pGr79" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Monserrate Daricek (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186777">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186778" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290262621"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>is gettin ready to take a monster dump....I know, sounds weird, but hey! Everyone does it, Im just open about it ;).</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186778&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IRv95EDi2BX0EsAQojZVRF5KTrXiNR0MwpAPhgjy784"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.hudeem-vmeste.ru/blog" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Darius Izaguirre (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186778">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186779" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1290294604"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Usually the thought of Monkeys with computers pops in my head when I usually use the net as they call it, but this is actually one of the few glass half full constructed pages I've seen in a bit. Not only is it an Interesting and compelling read, but it's also put together good and visually appealing. If by any chance you need help running this blog or any other projects you have going on shoot me a email or a reply.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186779&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YQvtAM4KAs3wgt4F_LSJaxT7QFzZSA38Qy-jyjQ2gAM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://stemcellumbilicalcordbloodbanking.com/category/donating-umbilical-cord-blood" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cord blood donation (not verified)</a> on 20 Nov 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186779">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186780" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1292336332"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Now a days it is very clear that eruptions and earthquakes have some relation with radioactive elements. Actually those are emitting radioactive gas radon which identified at the main cause of lung cancer. Sad there is a stats of 20000 death in USA for this gas.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186780&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WrfWbQcE-R2mKMU2mG-_D3AnupWLt0N589iSE44dBiA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.miljolab.no" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">radonmÃ¥ling oslo (not verified)</a> on 14 Dec 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186780">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/05/21/more-signs-point-towards-a-sau%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Thu, 21 May 2009 09:39:36 +0000 eklemetti 103967 at https://www.scienceblogs.com Harrat Lunayyir and the Saudi Arabian earthquake swarm https://www.scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/20/harrat-lunayyir-and-the-saudi <span>Harrat Lunayyir and the Saudi Arabian earthquake swarm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I have finally gotten together enough to create a <a href="http://earth.google.com/" target="_blank">Google Earth</a> image (below) of the location of the <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/saudi_arabian_earthquake_updat.php" target="_blank">Saudi Arabian earthquakes</a> and their depths/magnitudes. I only have the data from the <a href="http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_all.html" target="_blank">USGS earthquake list</a>, but it is very illuminating:</p> <form mt:asset-id="13554" class="mt-enclosure mt-enclosure-image" style="display: inline;"><img src="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/wp-content/blogs.dir/312/files/2012/04/i-12fbbc67ce47dad0d5684d2bb20ae622-Saudi Earthquakes2_sm.jpg" alt="i-12fbbc67ce47dad0d5684d2bb20ae622-Saudi Earthquakes2_sm.jpg" /></form> <p><em>Harrat Lunayyir volcano in western Saudi Arabia from Google Earth with the current earthquakes shown on the image. Image courtesy of Google, earthquake data from the USGS. <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/Saudi%20Earthquakes2.jpg" target="_blank">Click here</a> to see a larger version.</em></p> <p>The earthquakes look like this (<em>all times are Universal Time</em>):<br /><strong>Date Time Mag. Depth</strong><br /> 5/17 19:50 M4.6 10 km<br /> 5/19 06:38 M4.9 10 km<br /> 5/19 16:54 M4.9 10 km<br /> 5/19 17:35 M5.7 7.6 km<br /> 5/19 19:57 M4.6 10 km<br /> 5/19 20:35 M4.6 10 km</p> <p>There are likely a bunch of smaller events going on as well, but this is all the data I have on hand. Overall, the depth over the last few days doesn't seem to be significantly changing (within the error of the depth estimates). I'm still not sure how this shows that <a href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/05/an_eruption_brewing_in_saudi_a.php" target="_blank">magma is moving</a> (according to some of the early quotes from Saudi Arabian officials)<br /><em><strong><br /> UPDATE 11:45 AM Pacific</strong></em>: Just as I posted this, I saw this: <a href="http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/LK611344.htm" target="_blank">Saudi Arabian officials have extended the emergency zone out 40 km from the earthquakes</a>. No clear indication whether they are doing this out of fear of the seismicity or potential volcanic activity, but it definitely shows increasing concern. </p> <p><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0301-04-" target="_blank">Harrat Lunayyir is a lava field</a> about which we honestly don't know too much. It is relatively small compared to other lava fields in western Saudi Arabia, but some flows made it to the Red Sea, a distance of 50 km / 35 miles! In terms of previous eruptions, the only datum is a potential eruption around <a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0301-04-&amp;volpage=erupt" target="_blank">1000 A.D.</a>, but beyond that, not too much. If you look at the image (above), you can see the dark black basaltic (or basanite) lava flows. You can also see the image is pockmocked with reddish dots - these are oxidized cinder cones, a very common feature of lava fields.</p> <p>The fact that these earthquakes all seem to be centered under a known lava field should be a sign of concern. Without confirmation of some of the eyewitness accounts, there is still a chance that these might not be related to the lava field, but until we can get more information, we're still left to speculate.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/author/eklemetti" lang="" about="/author/eklemetti" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eklemetti</a></span> <span>Wed, 05/20/2009 - 08:13</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/google-earth" hreflang="en">Google Earth</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/harrat-lunayyir" hreflang="en">Harrat Lunayyir</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/satellite-images" hreflang="en">Satellite images</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/saudi-arabia" hreflang="en">Saudi Arabia</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/seismicity" hreflang="en">seismicity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/speculation" hreflang="en">speculation</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tag/volcano-monitoring" hreflang="en">volcano monitoring</a></div> </div> </div> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186734" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242826085"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre has a good mapping utility.. click on an earthquake for detail .....</p> <p><a href="http://www.emsc-csem.org/index.php?page=home">http://www.emsc-csem.org/index.php?page=home</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186734&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="zKzKEyle61Fd3DuBT1ONukia-_dvIfNYA2O3KpXAG0g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186734">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186735" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242829560"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik; roughly, what are the dimensions of the image in km?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186735&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WTbtz4bcYeRRoimex78A0AWM4h1yeoe0OwIDn21QHf0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186735">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186736" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242829891"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Mike Don - That is an excellent question ... and a mistake that I would have taken points off from my students if they forgot the map scale (doh!) Anyway, from right to left, it is <b>~98 km / 60 miles</b> across in this image. Sorry!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186736&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="GTRbc4kstqHc9kzRIqBsM8OKNwtJ2ko28pNsGjaHo9A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186736">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186737" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242833487"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wish I knew more seismology :o( The pattern doesn't SEEM like tectonic quakes; don't they usually tend to have a major shock followed by lesser aftershocks, rather than a series at similar magnitude? They're mostly at the same depth, which doesn't suggest magma rising (although the lesser events could, possibly, tell a different tale). Relief of crustal stress because of the mass of the volcanic structure? Hardly..this is no Fuji or Shasta. </p> <p>Could it be magma movement with a large lateral component..i.e injection of a sill?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186737&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="_eb6yYWgpiDnFkvCnO4qVsqnUE1bh1ytidXGkPWh1qA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186737">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186738" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242835220"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I continue to believe that magma injecton could be a consequence of the tectonic activity wich drives the molten rocks uplift by strong changes in the stress field.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186738&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gCVkoKIE8kh7q-bUW4oLFYZwxFCF5kkhBxIUy2aBb8E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://aldopiombino.blogspot.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aldo (not verified)</a> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186738">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186739" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242837148"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Erik</p> <p>Have you tried Live Search? This GIS option from MSN includes aerial photographs which provide good resolution over this area. You can input Lat Long values into the address e.g 25 10 31.22N 37 46 21.29E</p> <p><a href="http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&amp;FORM=LMLTCP&amp;cp=25.175583~37.772541&amp;style=h&amp;lvl=13&amp;tilt=-90&amp;dir=0&amp;alt=-1000&amp;phx=0&amp;phy=0&amp;phscl=1&amp;where1=25%2010%2031.22N%2037%2046%2021.29E&amp;encType=1">http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&amp;FORM=LMLTCP&amp;cp=25.175583~37.77254…</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186739&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="WjmDeYfauXjF0VmqQGPR59tnhr7BCQxAu-QbMqd8Rgg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Philip Mulholland (not verified)</span> on 20 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186739">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186740" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242881913"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>from a1saudiarabia.com: eruption now likely : "The warning was issued following the discovery of dangerous gases and unusually hot air and water in wells as the frequency of tremors increased in Al-Ais. A Civil Defense source said the discoveries suggested a volcanic eruption was likely" ??</p> <p><a href="http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Thousands-evacuated-from-Al-Ais/#more-5169">http://www.a1saudiarabia.com/Thousands-evacuated-from-Al-Ais/#more-5169</a></p> <p>All evacuated from Al-Eis<br /><a href="http://tinyurl.com/pr9cno">http://tinyurl.com/pr9cno</a> (Saudi Gazette)</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186740&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="OYsQqZJmUgmzjPlgDAjZ_Aazc4d5HWh8SIF8_mTXp0g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186740">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186741" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242893338"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Shame on you, you did take points off my sketches for no scale bar!</p> <p>But also, I'm curious about the extent of the lava flows. 50 km strikes me as a long way for a basalt flow to travel. Is it just that there's sufficient slope (900 m/50 km) to get the basalt to the sea, or is there something else I'm missing?</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186741&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8prOfl1dWn2ESr29QQLk3Cnz_i8pozDYdMA56nLzqzY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://hydrogeo.wordpress.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anne Jefferson (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186741">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186742" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242894544"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Robert Somerville's grab bag tectonic theory (original ??) for western Saudi Arabia ...</p> <p>the magma coming up from the red sea spreading center is too buoyant (hot) to be subducted in the Persian/Arabian gulf .. it is accumulating under Western Saudi Arabia causing uplift and rifting/faulting/flood basaltic flows ...</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186742&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Fm77jM8_h0Y4hC9TQATfPoHlDfz-eDDKuNOfkPSYypA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">robert somerville (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186742">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186743" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242896646"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Interesting link from Malaysian news agency:</p> <p><a href="http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v5/newsindex.php?id=412677">http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v5/newsindex.php?id=412677</a></p> <p>Reading it, it seems to confirm stories of increased radon concentration etc, but neither 'explains' nor 'reassures' as per the headings.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186743&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xBD30xXMEw4dMCyxFuv7JM8C9cPwBPr9r0kOiZeVYdo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mike don (not verified)</span> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186743">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186744" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1242933958"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hey Anne! My guess is that if the lavas are true basalts or basanites, you don't need much of a slope from the source to make it to the see, especially if there is the potential for crusting over of the flows to form temporary lava tube system like we've seen in Hawai'i (or are suggested for the Columbia River Basalts). However, that is still a pretty long way for any lava flow to make it!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186744&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="8BAJe-S_IB_bv7fCE-qJH-n-7K5e8KpQuXLPG6gT-xs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Erik Klemetti (not verified)</a> on 21 May 2009 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186744">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186745" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1263815128"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There is an article on these evenst here<br /><a href="http://www.emsc-csem.org/docs/data/newsletters/newsletter_24_low.pdf">http://www.emsc-csem.org/docs/data/newsletters/newsletter_24_low.pdf</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186745&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="I2RG4QgXv7EVdsYHXPAPp20OW0047SJWbW7bQcekJAU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Seismo (not verified)</span> on 18 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186745">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186746" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1263815269"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There is an article on these evenst here<br /><a href="http://www.emsc-csem.org/docs/data/newsletters/newsletter_24_low.pdf">http://www.emsc-csem.org/docs/data/newsletters/newsletter_24_low.pdf</a></p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186746&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="ZHK8w_X2R1tNKHQ8ZpJ2j86pLgl2oocMs51B9xf5c7I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Seismo (not verified)</span> on 18 Jan 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186746">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-2186747" class="js-comment comment-wrapper clearfix"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1287316969"></mark> <div class="well"> <strong></strong> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>back in my days we only tasted some best of the bees out there did it like that and nothing really happened</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2186747&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="yk78cIOnv8q3cBYKqFMrRfqEaD7oP1pBc72nXF_wrAw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <em>By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mafia2crack.com" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mafia 2 crack (not verified)</a> on 17 Oct 2010 <a href="https://www.scienceblogs.com/taxonomy/term/27923/feed#comment-2186747">#permalink</a></em> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0" hreflang="und"><img src="/files/styles/thumbnail/public/default_images/icon-user.png?itok=yQw_eG_q" width="100" height="100" alt="User Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> </footer> </article> </section> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-forbidden"><a href="/user/login?destination=/eruptions/2009/05/20/harrat-lunayyir-and-the-saudi%23comment-form">Log in</a> to post comments</li></ul> Wed, 20 May 2009 12:13:43 +0000 eklemetti 103965 at https://www.scienceblogs.com