"Great" headlines attack!


Africa is threatened by "scorching hot blobs of magma" according to the CSM.

Nothing like some fabulous headlines to make your day.

The first (courtesy of the Christian Science Monitor)
Massive blob of scorching magma discovered under southern Africa

Oh my! Yes, again, it seems that the many people in the media seem to be very confused about the nature of magma when it is underground - always expecting giant vats of swirling, molten magma rising up to destroy us all. Very few have a good sense of the real state of the Earth's mantle - mostly solid. The article is in fact about a recent study that shows evidence of a mantle plume underneath southern Africa. Now, a mantle plume isn't magma as such - it is just hotter, rising mantle material that melts through decompression generation small amounts of melt ... but are not "hot, gushy gunk" as the Livescience article on the plume suggests either. Of course, the original source article in Geophysical Research Letters, titled "A narrow, mid-mantle plume below southern Africa" (Sun et al., 2010, GRL, 37, L09302, doi:10.1029/2009GL042339) doesn't exactly make things clear to the layman when the article starts with "new waveform tomographic evidence displays a narrow plume-like feature emitting from the top of the large African low-velocity structure in the lower mantle." The mid-mantle plume itself is potentially linked to the rifting of Africa along the East African Rift, but it appears that the main point of the article is that the researchers were able to visualize (using seismic data) a 150 km diameter plume in the mid mantle under southern Africa - but that was before the usual game of telephone that many of these scientific article face when they are released.

The second headline (courtesy of Jaunted.com):
Another Volcano Erupts; Will It Be Eyjafjallajokull Part Two?

Ah yes, now that we've had one once-in-a-lifetime eruption like Eyjafjallajökull, now every eruption will disrupt air travel for the planet. Guess what eruption this article mentions? Shiveluch in Kamchatka - a volcano in an almost constant state of eruption. And heck, we even have a benchmark for how a Far Eastern Russian eruption can effect air travel - and it ain't no Eyjafjallajökull. In fact, Russian officials have been clear to say that an eruption of Shiveluch is not likely to affect air travel. The article is full of "useful" information like "Since it became active again, Shiveluch's crater has increased by 50% and its slopes have become perilously steep", which actually offers us no real useful data for understanding what is going on now at the volcano - is this different than usual? What does an "increasing" crater mean? The slopes are "perilously steep" for what? You get the idea. I wonder how long it will be until every volcanic eruption isn't couched in the context of the Eyjafjallajökull event.

More like this

The steam-and-ash plume from Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland, March 22, 2010. Overnight, the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland added to its oeuvre, producing what is being reported to be a 8-km plume. Images of the plume (above) suggest (to me) that it is very water-rich, so likely this is the…
Eyjafjallajökull, an ice-capped volcano in Iceland that last erupted in 1823. We talked a few weeks ago of signs that there were increasing signs that an eruption could occur on Iceland - increased seismicity on the Reykjanes Ridge suggested that magma might be on the move. Now, we have two pieces…
A shot of the strombolian activity at the vent of Eyjafjallajökull, taken on May 4, 2010. Image courtesy of the Iceland Met Office. The latest news from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption has the volcano erupting more explosively again (see above), possibly due to an increased influx of water into the…
News! The summit crater lake at Gorely in Russia, taken on June 21, 2010. Image courtesy of KVERT. Eruptions readers have been abuzz about how KVERT will be closing shop (yet again) at the end of June. This would, of course, leave no local monitoring and expertise in the very active Kamchatka…

Wow! How fantastic is this lava lake at Nyiragongo. The African Rift seems to keep many surprises to vulcanophyles. Think we should place a live cam there too. There seems to be a lot to understand about mantle plume / rifting interactions there.

OT: Still, I don't believe Lady E is over yet. It's been exhibiting a continuous steam plume that seems to get sturdier everyday.

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 21 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Renato I Silveira, From what I can tell it looks over, and it has been quiet now for almost a month now. So I am not expecting anything grate. But I am known to have things wrong. But this moment, everything is quiet.

@Jón #2 If you say so, who am I to say the contrary? Maybe it's my sheer desire to come back to the old times when Lady E was putting up beautiful shows. I intend to be lurking around for some while because the landscape looks beautiful by the midnight sun.
But please! Don't say you're wrong about anything! You are the godfather of this eruption, the hero of this blog, from the beginning, you have been able to predict it's awakening and provide us with precious informations with your posts, helicorders and tremor plots.
Let's not give up and linger around a bit more. I have hopes. And Jón, your contribution won't be forgotten. In my next trip to Austria I'll go see Birgit's museum with the ash samples you collected.
You deserve all our respect and gratitude.
Thank you Jón FrÃmann!

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 21 Jun 2010 #permalink

The Russians don't use the UK MET computers, so off course air traffic won't be efffected :P

Does this rising mantle plume suggest that at some point in the distant future we can expect to see a flood basalt eruption around the east african rift??

Eric, have you ever heard of Franz Gunnar Bengtsson, author of "The Long Ships"? His mastery of language was such that if he had written in English, he would have been considered one of the Great Authors of all time. Alas, he only knew Swedish intimately enough!

Anyhow, Franz G. Bengtsson once wrote an essay/short story titled "Othello and the Football Reporter" in which the great Chicago newspaper found that their acclaimed critic was ill and could not attend the première of "Othello" at the Chicago Opera House. The only available reporter was a young sports writer working late, a man who never had heard of Shakespeare, let alone Othello. He covered the story as if it was a football match and to the great surprise of his Editor, his article elicited such positive feedback that he was immediately employed as the paper's main arts critic.

Back in the 1940s, the idea was so ludicrous that the story was thought hillarious and it was also a reflection on the aspirations of the truly ignorant.

Now that we are there, a world where ambitious ignorance is seen as a virtue, almost a prerequisite for a successful career even in the Academic world (cf Professor Northcote C Parkinson & Parkinson's Law), it is not so much fun. Nor is there much we can do about it - except poke fun at it as these self-important people hate nothing more than to be seen as the butt-end of a joke.

Keep up the good job!

By Henrik, Swe (not verified) on 21 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Chris, IS [7] - most likely the weather: a real dust storm visible at the Thórólfsfell camera. (Or was, when there was something else than brownish gray). The changes are minimal in absolute values, although they look impressive on a scaled plot.

By Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Erik: having read the article on Shiveluch, I suspect that it was just a peg on which to hang a rant about the 'over-reaction' of air safety regulators during the Eyja eruption. Details of the eruption itself were a secondary consideration

I agree the 'crater 50% bigger' makes no sense whatsoever, although the 'steepening slopes' is reasonable enough when dealing with a large dome -but how many readers of the piece would know about that?

The author obviously did his research via a quick Wiki scan

Mike Don - I'd definitely agree with that interpretation of the Shiveluch piece. However, it does try desperately to come across as legitimate "news" even though it is more or less an opinion piece - and that sort of stuff drives me nuts. News should be news and opinion should be left in the coffee shops.

Sadly, many newspapers, especially 'tabloids' ..and their cyberspace equivalent, the "tabloid website" have long since mastered the art of presenting opinion (or downright propaganda) as 'news' Unless it's spotted by someone who knows about the subject -like yourself, in this case- the subtle opinion-forming will pass unnoticed. It's pernicious

I've often thought that science should be written like tabloid news in tabloid newspapers. "Earth's crust has holes in it where thousand-degree lava escapes!!!" as a definition of a volcano.

Using simple words and active verbs to describe scientific method might be a step to teaching critical thinking. "Scientists, testing the theory of the movement of earth's crust, discovered that lava erupts as the continents move away from each other!!!'

By parclair NoCal USA (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Erik,
Your comment (#11) I think needs to be addressed.

Jaunted.com is not a great website, this much is plain, the writing in it is clearly not Pulitzer-worthy. However you have set it up a straw man and proceeded to criticize it for something it is not.

It is not a "legitimate 'news'" site, and never claims to be for reasons that will become clear. Though it is owned by Condé Nast, on its "About" page (http://www.jaunted.com/special/about) the term "news" is never used. Instead it professes to be a "pop culture travel review for a generation that possesses a small attention span" written with "Participatory Journalism." to criticize it for articles expressing opinions is like criticizing a blogger for expressing opinions, it's not meant to be unbiased.

Do you really think this is what a "legitimate news" site looks like?

Your quotation, "News should be news and opinion should be left in the coffee shops," I find particularly confusing. Are you saying that no website should express opinions? Should you leave your opinions "in coffee shops"?

Good to hear from you, Quantos. I kind of guessed you'd come out of the woodwork after I posted this.

Anyway, the Jaunted piece is a strawman on purpose - it is meant to show the ridiculous use of headlines and scientific information on a website, which most people will count as "news" if they find it online. How many people do you know that will check the "about" page of a website if they find news of an eruption like this - few people cast a critical eye. I don't think it is what a legitimate news site looks like, but then again, I, like you, know what to look for in a news site.

Now, as for opinions, I think they should stay out of articles/website that purport to be news. However, if you want to rant and rave (like I do many times), feel free to do so on the web - just be careful to make it clear it isn't "information" but "opinion", something many news source no longer do when pundits rule the roost.

I'm reminded of the "storm of the century of the week" gag that the Daily Show used to great effect. At the heart of the joke is the short attention span of both the media and the public. I guess that would make Eyjafjallajökull the eruption of the century of the month.

Hi to all !,

@18 Lockwood,very good;my attention span was just long enough to work out the gag....
@16 Hi Jón.Thanks for the link. Your usual warning regarding translation (especially Google Translate) did not prepare me for the "translated" piece. I think I have suffered a slight injury from laughing so much !

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Erik, several points...

First and most concerning;
You said that "the Jaunted piece is a strawman on purpose."
You're saying you've intentionally misrepresented something (in this case the purported mission of the website) for the purpose of attacking it? They don't claim anywhere to be an unbiased source of news, but you attack them for not living up to that. That's kind of disingenuous don't you think? Isn't that akin to what the "pundits who rule the roost" would do?

Secondly, you go out of your way to point out that Russian officials say that there will likely be no disruption in travel. I'm not sure why you need to go out of your way to emphasize that fact, because the article says the same in the 3rd sentence.

Third, it's disappointing you hold the news going public in such low regard. How do you quantify that "few people cast a critical eye"? Why is it you think people are unable to tell the difference between writing with opinions (which can hold information, look at newspapers abroad, the unbiased reporting model is largely a U.S. invention) and straight reporting just by looking at it? What is your justification that most people don't look at the "About" section of a website, or can't tell the difference between a "legitimate news site" and a travel website run using user submitted content? These assertions you are throwing around so far seem to have little solid evidence to back them up.

My fundamental objection is this: It hardly seems fair for you to find a website that doesnât claim to be a news site, call it one, then criticize it for not fitting your (rather curious) definition of a news site.

Third. It's disappointing you hold the newsgoing public in such low regard. How do you quantify that "few people cast a critical eye"? Why is it you think people are unable to tell the difference between opinion writing (which can hold information) and straight reporting just by looking at it. What is your justification that most people don't look at the "About" section of a website, or can't tell the difference between a "legitimate news site" and a travel website run using user submitted content? These assertions you are throwing around so far seem to have little solid evidence to back them up.

Please disregard the above post, Cut and Paste was on the fritz, below is the final version.

Erik, several points...

First and most concerning;
You said that "the Jaunted piece is a strawman on purpose."
You're saying you've intentionally misrepresented something (in this case the purported mission of the website) for the purpose of attacking it? They don't claim anywhere to be an unbiased source of news, but you attack them for not living up to that. That's kind of disingenuous don't you think? Isn't that akin to what the "pundits who rule the roost" would do?

Secondly, you go out of your way to point out that Russian officials say that there will likely be no disruption in travel. I'm not sure why you need to go out of your way to emphasize that fact, because the article says the same in the 3rd sentence.

Third, it's disappointing you hold the news going public in such low regard. How do you quantify that "few people cast a critical eye"? Why is it you think people are unable to tell the difference between writing with opinions (which can hold information, look at newspapers abroad, the unbiased reporting model is largely a U.S. invention) and straight reporting just by looking at it? What is your justification that most people don't look at the "About" section of a website, or can't tell the difference between a "legitimate news site" and a travel website run using user submitted content? These assertions you are throwing around so far seem to have little solid evidence to back them up.

My fundamental objection is this: It hardly seems fair for you to find a website that doesnât claim to be a news site, call it one, then criticize it for not fitting your (rather curious) definition of a news site.

Sigh. I guess I just don't know what a strawman is (which is my fault).

I used the Jaunted piece to show how science news is misused on the internet - whether or not the website claims to be a "news" site - it is as simple as that. And as my readers know, I think that people need to hold a more critical eye to what they read online, where the line between news and entertainment is highly blurred. Obviously, you seem to have it out for me, which is fine, not everyone likes my blog, so I will leave it at that.

@Jón 16 I've noticed it on the Thoro cam also.
Yesterday Eyjaf was more active than the weeks before.
When the clouds where gone small explosions where visable every few seconds making small ash plumes.
Sadly most of the time the crater is covered with clouds.
Also the steamplume seems to get bigger the last few day's.

Thoro cam is giving quite the show right now. Very interesting steam plume coming down the side. Looks like its channeling down a bit further than what I have seen before (though I'm not an avid watcher).

By Laura from Canada (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Greg (#4 and link below)

You must have been reading http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/7841724/Met-Office-apologises-af…

Lol.

Philippines - "Nanny" state to the world?

Nanny state sends out fake txt messages to further panic the population

If it's really such a threat, level 3 it and evacuate.

Posted by: Greg | June 15, 2010 8:27 AM

scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/06/tourists_volcanoes_and_governm.php#comment-2590105

Hmm, it is June 23rd in Fiji now.

Earthquakes can never be predicted.

It can happen anytime and anywhere says the Mineral Resources Department. Seismologist Sakaraia Vunisa says there is no need for people to panic about the so called 23rd June prophesy.

http://www.radiofiji.com.fj/fullstory.php?id=28564

Not sure what your beef is, Quantos. Eric *could* have pointed out that the travel/airlines industries set themselves up for the Eyjaf ash cloud snafu.

Travel officials knew that a historic eruption was in progress in Iceland, with plenty of advanced warning in the month-long fissure eruption, with warnings of potential for crater eruption, thanks to IMO and IES and documentation provided here on historical eruptions of Eyjaf and Katla.

The travel industry KNEW that prevailing weather/wind patterns that had been in place for months, and were responsible for unusually wet and cool conditions over the UK and Western Europe in late Winter and early Spring, might bring the ashfall over Europe.

They were complacent to potential flight risk and instead took advantage of signs of economic recovery and the upcoming the Easter break to lure thousands of tourists from within Europe and abroad (including Asia) into last-minute booking deals for early season air travel, instead of issuing cautionary warnings and advising those with nonessential travel plans to wait for regular summer season.

They were greedy and unthinking, were quick to shift blame to air traffic authority, didn't seem particularly empathetic to travelers hardship.

The air travel industry was ballsy enough to announce two weeks ago that they were poised to rake in substantial profits this year, despite the ashfall closures in Europe and much teeth gnashing over projected losses as recently as mid-May.

The travel industry was HAPPY to play the hindsight game and point fingers everywhere else than at themselves for blame.

Furthermore, Erik could have wielded a heavy hammer of criticism at the inept comparison, in the Jaunted 'news' article, of air traffic risk for the European theatre versus the US North Pacific, in the event of a large volcanic eruption at Shiveluch.

Despite heavy eruption activity in the Kamchatka-Kurile-Aleutian chains in 2008-09 (with *highly* unusual coeruptions and substantial number of VEI3-4s in this time period), there was relatively little disruption of air traffic - thanks to the combined monitoring actions of the Pacific VAAC group, AVO, KVERT and SVERT.

@Jón #16
@Adrian #19
"See here, translate at your own risk.
http://www.ruv.is/frett/oskusprengingar-i-eyjafjallajokli"

"He also said he would have seen black prenatal clinics from the glacier in late last night." (Copied and pasted from Google Translator)

The translation comes out like this in all languages I can read.
Didn't know there were such clinics on Eyjafjallajökull!!! LOL

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

This Jun 17th Rianovosti article may have been the news source that Jaunted.com was using for wording of their 'report' on Shiveluch.

en.rian.ru/natural/20100617/159456439.html

I don't think they (Conde Nast) actually cite this source officially nor link to it, either which would be a copyright violation.

@d9tRotterdam #9
Thank you for the time lapse footages. They help a lot to understand what's going on.
I suppose the "plume" we've been seeing could be whirlwinds pulling ash from the crater and old paths of lava in the glacier. Every now and then you notice a small steam puff rising behind the "ash plume", which is what the eruption is really doing now. When you look at instant images you think something bad is happening.
Keep posting, d9tRotterdam, your doing a very good job!

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@28 Renato,Hi,

He also said he would have seen black prenatal clinics from the glacier in late last night." (Copied and pasted from Google Translator)

That is the paragraph that had me crying with laughter !
Im still laughing now.

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Adrian #31 Me too. At first I had it translated into Portuguese and I couldn't believe my eyes, then I switched to English, Spanish and French and I got the same. Usually Google translator does a better job in English, but not this time.
Jón could you or anyone here explain why they need clinics on a glacier? And why they should be black? Maybe it's an ancient viking tradition and we're playing the fools here! :)

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Hi Renato,

The mind boggles,haha,Google Translator leaves a bit tooo much to the imagination.
Re your post @30. Im still sure that there is ash being "blasted" out from Eyja at times,its just not continuous.The next heavy fall of rain there will lay all the ash/dust down.But of course,by then she may be quiet again.

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Adrian #31 Ok. I have a theory on this: Try to imagine a mother, just about to give birth, desperately looking for a hospital, in the middle of a glacier, near an erupting volcano. Would she ever find one if it were painted in white?

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@34 Renato,

arrgh,but of course;that explains things perfectly...Lololol

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Adrian #36 Good news, indeed. I always heard they planted grapevines over Vesuvius slopes because they were more fertile, but never knew why. BTW Have you seen the blue flowers on Múlakot cams?
http://www.mulakot.net/myndavelar.html

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Renato - PLEASE use something else than mediafire, like Picasa Web or Tinyurl. I mean that link opened up into anything but the picture you intended to show us: 99.9 percent were ads, and the picture never showed.

By Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Kultsi #39 Oops! Olen pahoillani! Sorry for the ads. I'll try Picassa and send the link later.

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Hi Renato,

I found the link fine.....I think that the bird is....an Arctic Tern.Ok,an Icelandic Stork...

Thats definately ash on Eyja on Thoro Cam now being deposited by the wind. It looks like talcum powder.

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

#41 @Adrian
An Arctic Tern? How fantastic! I wouldn't ever have dreamed of taking a picture from my home in Rio of an Arctic tern!!!!
This is Internet.
That's why I'm addicted to this blog. Thank you guys!!!

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Renato [42] - That link worked perfectly!

By Kultsi, Askola, FI (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Ok, fellows, I must go back to work now.
Thanks to you people I learned a little more today: my first Picassa journey, my first Arctic tern, swedish playwright Gunnar Bengtsson and so much more... I'll certainly be back for more.
Thanks Eric!
Have a good evening!!!!

By Renato I Silveira (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@ 30l, with thanks to #9 for provision of time-lapsed video.

>I suppose the "plume" we've been seeing could be whirlwinds pulling ash from the crater and old paths of lava in the glacier.

No, I don't think so. At least some of the swirling clouds at the summit were (visibly) due to continued low level emission of steam from the crater vents. Very interesting low altitude wind action. There were definite brief periods of entrainment of deposited ash in the morrain/valley, as observed on the Mulakot webcams.

The following article is a must-read for anyone considering a career in science. It discusses the issues facing graduates in the sciences, and why, for the near future, an advanced science degree may not be the best idea.

Living in a university town, I find the discussion compelling and consistent with what I see among the young folk. I was dumped into the work world in the early 70's and decided not to pursue an advanced degree in science exactly because of the issues described in this article. (I did pursue a computer business degree. Heh.)

http://www.miller-mccune.com/science/the-real-science-gap-16191/

By parclair, NoCal USA (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@26 earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/us2010xvcb.php

There was a M 5.5 earthquake in Fiji region on June 23rd. No surprise there really notwithstanding

Prime Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama has warned those spreading the so called prophesy of a natural disaster next week Wednesday they will be taken to task under the Public Emergency Regulations.

Unfortunately Suva isn't Rome. Italy is a republic. Thus

Open letter to the President of the Republic of Italy

Two weeks ago in Italy, the LâAquila Prosecutorâs office indicted scientists, some of them members of the âCommissione Grandi Rischiâ (Commission for High Risks), and civil protection officials for manslaughter. The basis for the indictment is that these people did not provide a short-term alarm to the population after a meeting of the Commission held in LâAquila six days before the Mw 6.3 earthquake that struck that city and the surrounding area.

The allegations against the scientists are completely unfounded. Years of research worldwide have shown that there is currently no scientifically accepted method for short-term earthquake prediction that can reliably be used by Civil Protection authorities for rapid and effective emergency actions. ...

http://www.mi.ingv.it/open_letter/

By Raving at myself (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

Raving, please go back a few day's worth of threads here and read my two posts.

I think it would be *superb idea*, if our friend Boris and a friend of his from INGV - if they were so inclined - were to write up a wee chitchat guest column here on Eruptions, on the recently deduced, complex geology of central Italy, as it not only impacts earthquake risk in Central Italy, but also volcanic risk for active clusters in Sicily and Italy.

What happened at LâAquila last year is an apt lesson on rapidly changing geological conditions within the Mediterranean Basin. We may as well put that lesson to Effective Use.

You would be surprised who reads this blog.

Quantos, you're kidding, right? I understand you have challenges with "cut and paste" but, once you learn how to do it, paste "source credibility" into whatever search engine you're using and read. Read all the links too.

Sorry for the O/T, folks.

Ok, back to quiet reading here.

By Princess Frito (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Raving and whoever else you're arguing with:

What does Jim Prall's blog about climate change and far-out Canadian political leanings have to do with volcanoes or even geology?

Lately there seems to be an attempt to dilute, even pollute this blog. Is it because it's popular and credible and now people with their own agendas are using it for towards their own ends?

Tragic if its so.

By Princess Frito (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

What happened at LâAquila last year is an apt lesson on rapidly changing geological conditions within the Mediterranean Basin. We may as well put that lesson to Effective Use.

Posted by: Passerby | June 22, 2010 10:22 PM

I don't know Passerby. Reality is queerer than these freaky news clips. Common sense has become a rarity and doesn't seem so real.

What do you want me to say? The problem is that whatever is said can be subjectively spun about to infer about any of many unstated insinuations.

:-|


...Hastings joined McChrystal and his team in Paris. It was supposed to be a two-day visit, followed up by more reporting time in Afghanistan,

The volcano in Iceland, however, changed the plans. As the ash disrupted air travel, Hastings ended up being "stuck" with McChrystal and his team for 10 days in Paris and Berlin.

Due to the volcano, McChrystal had to travel from Paris to Berlin by bus. Hastings said McChrystal and his aides were drinking on the road trip "the whole way."

"They let loose," he said. "I don't blame them; they have a hard job."...

http://worldblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/06/22/4544711-volcano-disrupt…

@Princess Frito | June 23, 2010 1:49 AM

scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/06/sakurajima_cant_keep_its_top_o.php#comment-2603966

scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/06/sakurajima_cant_keep_its_top_o.php#comment-2604277

As for the "diluting" of this blog, it would seem that society is having a huge problem with 'professional conduct and competency'

Those Italian indictments are real. It seems easy and sensible to dismiss it as scapegoating. Yet negligence and/or incompetence are also relevant aspects. There are many sides and many ways of cutting and limiting.

The debate about informing the public as to a predicted earthquake,the liabilities and consequences of doing so or not doing so has been going on for a couple of decades (?) if not longer.

It is a serious business with no easy answer. The topic is mature in seismology & volcanology. There is experience with considering the many varied sides.

Don't be so quick to dismiss the topic of accountability and action. Ignore it by pretending that the subject is nonsense at even greater peril of acting in a negligent manner.

Major earthquakes will occur. Many people will die. A significant part of the 'science' is involved with improving anticipated expectation. When and how does the geophysicist speak up or remain silent?

By Raving Kurtz (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Raving - re: your quote "it would seem that society is having a huge problem with 'professional conduct and competency'.

Yes, so I suggest you start at home and slowly move outward from there as you improve.

By Princess Frito (not verified) on 22 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Prince Fritto:
I think that Raving is rather succintly keaping to the subject in this thread. He is covering both the subject of how science is treated in the news (and sadly in the Italian joke courts), and keaping it close to the subject of this entire Blog.

I would also like to mention that the Raving by Erik (our gracious Blog-host) is very close to the Raving by Raving in his comments.
Put quite simply, I think it is you who have lost the purpose of this thread, and that you might have forgotten that we always have to fight for scientific freedom against the "powers that may be".

Now I will go back to studying a "new" volcano favorite that is showing some very minute stirings! It might be the Quako in Waco:)

@Princess Frito (#54)

It felt as if we just had an earthquake.

By Raving | Hogtown (not verified) on 23 Jun 2010 #permalink

Is everyone ok over there ???

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 23 Jun 2010 #permalink

Uhm, for those who *blush* ..

news.globaltv.com/story.html?id=3191994#

Also twitpic.com/1zbdkh

@61 Raving quaking,Hi,

Glad you're ok ! I did think that a Mag 5.0 was quite rare for that part of the world.
As for the G20 fake lake,can't someone put it in the nearest bathtub and "drown it" or would the politicians consider that act an even bigger waste of taxpayers money !

By Adrian,Dorset, UK (not verified) on 23 Jun 2010 #permalink

@Raving- (Totally off topic, I know) Can you believe that fake lake? Man. I was thinking that it'd be some great lake for 1.9 million... but it looks like they just used a tradeshow backdrop, filled a hole with water, stuck a deck on it and added some canoes. No bueno. I would like to know if it got some wave action though. ;)

But yes, thankfully no reports of anyone injured that I've found yet. Seems like it just shook everyone up a bit. I'm from an area that just got hit with a tornado, though it never has been before- so we just keep getting shocked.

By Laura from Canada (not verified) on 23 Jun 2010 #permalink

Technical question: When KVERT ceases to work at the end of the June do all AVIATION COLOR CODE ADVISORIES automatically go green?

-----------------------------
KVERT WILL WORK TILL JUNE 30, 2010.

KVERT HAVE NOT the AGREEMENT with RUSAVIATION from JULY 01, 2010.

Kamchatkan and Northern Kuriles Volcanic Activity
KVERT INFORMATION RELEASE 31-10
June 24, 2010, 22:15 UTC (June 25, 10:15 KDT)

SUMMARY OF AVIATION COLOR CODES:

KAMCHATKA:
SHEVELUCH, KLYUCHEVSKOY and KARYMSKY: ORANGE
GORELY and BEZYMIANNY: YELLOW

TOLBACHIK PLOSKY, KORYAKSKY, AVACHINSKY, MUTNOVSKY and KIZIMEN: GREEN

NORTHERN KURILES:
EBEKO, CHIKURACHKI and ALAID: GREEN

CURRENT CHANGES IN AVIATION COLOR CODE:
AVIATION COLOR CODE OF GORELY: YELLOW

GORELY VOLCANO: 52°33'N, 158°02'E; Elevation 1,828 m
AVIATION COLOR CODE IS YELLOW
PREVIOUS AVIATION COLOR CODE WAS GREEN

Know what you need to do to be compliant and avoid the risk while Translation Medical Insert, Translations Medical Insert and gain the perspective and position of a medical device industry expert.

Oh goodie...
SPAM (and not out of a can) and Erik is gone so noone to remove it...

Is it just me, or would you ever trust something that is purporting to translate things, that spell that bad and has that horrible grammar as the thingy above?

*sighs sadly and heads for the beach*

What you said made . Nevertheless, think about this, let's say you included a little bit more? I am talking about, I dont tend to tell you how to write your website, but what if you added something that could get people's particular attention? Just simply as a video or maybe a photo or perhaps few to obtain viewers interested concerning what you mentioned.

This is a savage truth truth : Most sponsors do not practice their folk. That is simply the way it is, and I simply wish it wasn't such as that, however it is. Inquire anyone who continues to be in MLM for many time. They can be going to say a similar thing, if they're truthful. That is why that a great coaching system, for example teaching manuals, cds, on the web training, and reside occasions and meeting call coaching is a total must. That offers the newest distributors a'menu' to choose from and to start getting their teaching straight away.

That is why we additionally had men and women order leads, and we called them. We called more than one bunch of sales opportunities as well. This at least would give us a feeling of consistency or insufficient it. The MLM Prospective customer businesses we chose were highly consistent in excellent of lead, and people who real were looking for a business. It took us 7 months to complete the research on MLM leads.