Yet another way climate change will affect birds

Changes in the daily variability of high and low temperatures in certain regions may stress wild bird populations. A new study of semi-wildish Zebra Finches demonstrates this. I have a post on the research here, at 10,000 birds. Have a look!

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Every pilot knows that it's easier to get a plane into the air on cold days — shorter takeoff runs — because cold air is denser than warm air. I wonder how this would affect birds. Would they need more food as the mean temperature of the air they fly in climbs?

By Christopher Winter (not verified) on 17 Nov 2015 #permalink