Friday Cephalopod: Planctoteuthis, I presume?

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Osborn's view of the progressive evolution of the brontotheres. Notice the references to the "geneplasm" at left, which Osborn interpreted as spontaneously giving rise to new adaptations. From Osborn (1935).Every now and then I like taking a break from the latest technical papers and conference…
I've been reading the Brian Herbert/Kevin J. Anderson prequels and sequels to the late Frank Herbert's Dune series. Dune is arguably the most influential sci-fi series ever, and in my opinion one of the best ever written, even Frank Herbert's later books in the series which people tend to shun.…
A traditional restoration of Platybelodon as seen in H.F. Osborn's 1936 elephant monograph. From Lambert (1992).Whenever I visit the American Museum of Natural History in New York I make sure to at least pass through the fourth-floor fossil halls before I leave, and one of my favorite displays…
Last week I looked at reconstructions of Diplodocus (both humorous and scientific) by Oliver Hay and G.G. Simpson. After rifling through my collection of papers, I came upon a description of Diplodocus by H.F. Osborn and thought I would continue the trend I had set earlier. In 1897, the AMNH sent a…

hi I have a question I can't find your email so I do it like this
It's just a general question from a simple person
I was thinking if there are different hominids at the same time on earth during evolution that would also be the case at this time. How are they called? Where can I find information about that? Or haven't they found a name yet and are they all called homo sapiens?
Is it so that further evolved hominids are today declared insane by the more simple homo sapiens and expelled from society like for instance the neanderthal bashed the skulls in of the first homo sapiens because it frightens them? I was wondering about that
thanks for any comment

By seja leeuwen (not verified) on 30 Dec 2016 #permalink