Fornvännen's Summer Issue On-Line

Fornvännen 2013:2, last summer's issue, is now on-line in its entirety on Open Access.

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Dress pin heads from Viidumäe on Saaremaa. Fornvännen 2015:4 is now on-line on Open Access. Therese Ekholm compares radiocarbon dates on bone versus charcoal from ostensibly closed contexts on Stone Age sites in northern Sweden. Tony Björk & Ylva Wickberg on continued investigations of the…
Fornvännen's web site has become subsumed into the general document repository of the National Heritage Board. I am not happy about this. But still, we can now offer two new issues on-line for free! So much good research here! Autumn 2012 (no 3): Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay on the first farmers of Öland.…
Fornvännen is not only a paper quarterly on its 107th year, but also an Open Access journal that appears for free with a 6-month delay. The autumn issue for 2011has just gone live! All papers have English abstracts and summaries. Påvel Nicklasson on 19th century zoologist and pioneering…
Fornvännen 2013:1, last spring's issue, is now on-line in its entirety on Open Access. Joy Boutrup et al. on openwork braids of silk and metal thread that decorated 15th century elite fashion garments. Påvel Nicklasson on zoologist and archaeological trailblazer Sven Nilsson's travels in England…

Whenever you put an edition of Fornvännen online I'm surprised that most of the articles are in Swedish. Is Nordic archeology so country specific that no one outside Sweden could be remotely interested in the topics? Or does Swedish server as lingua franca for the area?

Swedish, Danish and Norwegian don't really deserve to be called separate languages. Particularly in writing, they are mutually easily understood. And in Finland, most people know at least some Swedish and many are fluent in the language.

The reason that we don't generally publish in English is that archaeology is not a global discipline. It's a bunch of regional and chronological sub-disciplines that pretty much ignore each other.

"The coffin is made of pewter and fire-gilt bronze and brass"
Cue inevitable plug for Glen Cook's mildly spoofy fantasy novel "Petty Pewter Gods" (all the novels about Garret, P.I. have a metal in the title).

And like herpes, the Swedish legal framework for metal detecting will just not go away. I have noticed that once a policy is established in Sweden, it will take half a century of complaints before it is changed. (No, I will not give examples, I would go on writing all evening)

By Birger Johansson (not verified) on 13 Feb 2014 #permalink

This is a great comment and I as an amateur have the same view on Nordic Archeology:

"The reason that we don’t generally publish in English is that archaeology is not a global discipline. It’s a bunch of regional and chronological sub-disciplines that pretty much ignore each other."

I would add that Archeolgy in each Nordic country is not that interested in what happens in neighbour countries. Also, is the department in Lund interested in what happens in the departrment in Uppsala and the reverse? Perhaps that is too drastic?

By Thomas Ivarsson (not verified) on 13 Feb 2014 #permalink

The Degerberga, in Scania, linear monument looks very mucjh like the sensational and totally unique find of the same kind of monument in Uppsala:-)

By Thomas Ivarsson (not verified) on 13 Feb 2014 #permalink

"And like herpes, the Swedish legal framework for metal detecting will just not go away. " Very well said:-)